facebook
twitter
rss
account
search
search
Headlines

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, April 3, 2014.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, April 3, 2013.
By United Press International

Fla. mom allegedly tried to kill teen son

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Sept. 11 (UPI) -- A South Florida woman said she wanted to kill her son because she could not take care of him, and injured him with a bat and knife, police allege.

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, April 3, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, April 3, 2009.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, April 3, 2008.
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Tuesday, April 3, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Monday, April 3, the 93rd day of 2006 with 272 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, April 3, the 93rd day of 2005 with 272 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, April 3, the 94th day of 2004 with 272 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, April 3, the 93rd day of 2003 with 272 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, April 3, the 93rd day of 2002 with 272 to follow. The moon is waning, moving toward its last quarter.
By United Press International
Photos
John Burroughs
Wiki

John Burroughs (April 3, 1837 – March 29, 1921) was an American naturalist and essayist important in the evolution of the U.S. conservation movement. According to biographers at the American Memory project at the Library of Congress, John Burroughs was the most important practitioner after Thoreau of that especially American literary genre, the nature essay. By the turn of the century he had become a virtual cultural institution in his own right: the Grand Old Man of Nature at a time when the American romance with the idea of nature, and the American conservation movement, had come fully into their own. His extraordinary popularity and popular visibility were sustained by a prolific stream of essay collections, beginning with Wake-Robin in 1871.

In the words of his biographer Edward Renehan, Burroughs' special identity was less that of a scientific naturalist than that of "a literary naturalist with a duty to record his own unique perceptions of the natural world." The result was a body of work whose perfect resonance with the tone of its cultural moment perhaps explains both its enormous popularity at that time, and its relative obscurity since.

Burroughs was the seventh child of Chauncy and Amy Kelly Burroughs' ten children. He was born on the family farm in the Catskill Mountains, near Roxbury, New York in Delaware County. As a child he spent many hours on the slopes of Old Clump Mountain, looking off to the east and the higher peaks of the Catskills, especially Slide Mountain, which he would later write about. As he labored on the family farm he was captivated by the return of the birds each spring and other wildlife around the family farm including frogs and bumblebees. In his later years he credited his life as a farm boy for his subsequent love of nature and feeling of kinship with all rural things.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "John Burroughs."
Most Popular
1
Anna Nicole Smith's estate loses bid for ex J. Howard Marshall's millions
2
Northrop Grumman developing reusable space plane for lifting spacecraft into orbit
3
Stephanie Jacobsen joins cast of 'NCIS'
4
Texas man on trial for 'public execution' of drunk driver
5
Britain pardons World War II code-breaker castrated for homosexuality
x
Feedback