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Former President of Haiti Jean-Claude Duvalier and his wife Michele
Former President of Haiti Jean Claude Duvalier returned to Haiti on January 19, 2010 for the first time since he was deposed in 1986. After arriving in Port-au-Prince "Baby Doc" Duvalier indicated he intends to return to politics despite charges of financial corruption and human rights abuse awaiting him. President Duvalier and his wife Michele are shown in this 1980 file photo. UPI/wh/FILE
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Jean-Claude Duvalier (nicknamed "Bébé Doc" or "Baby Doc") (born July 3, 1951) was the ruler of Haiti from 1971 until his overthrow by a popular uprising in 1986. He succeeded his father, François "Papa Doc" Duvalier as the ruler of Haiti upon his father's death in 1971.

He was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and was raised in an isolated environment. He attended the most prestigious Haitian schools, College Bird and Saint-Louis de Gonzague. Later, under the direction of several prominent professors, including Maitre Gerard Gourgue, at the University of Haiti, he studied law. During April, 1971, he assumed the presidency of Haiti at the age of 19 upon the death of his father, François Duvalier (nicknamed "Papa Doc"), becoming the world's youngest president. Initially, Jean-Claude Duvalier resisted the dynastic arrangement that had made him Haiti's leader, having preferred that the presidency go to his older sister Marie-Denise Duvalier, and was content to leave substantive and administrative matters in the hands of his mother, Simone Ovide Duvalier, and a committee led by Luckner Cambronne, his father's Interior Minister, while he attended ceremonial functions and lived as a playboy.

Duvalier was invested with near-absolute power by the constitution. He took some steps to reform the regime, by releasing some political prisoners and easing censorship on the press. However, there were no substantive changes to the regime's basic character. Opposition was not tolerated, and the legislature remained a rubber stamp.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Jean-Claude Duvalier."
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