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Senate considers Paulson's financial bailout options in Washington
James Lockhart III, director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, testifies before the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee on the crises facing investment banks and other financial institutions on Capitol Hill in Washington on September 23, 2008. Congress is currently considering a $700 billion bailout proposed by the Bush administration. (UPI Photo/Roger L. Wollenberg)
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James Lockhart of Lee and Carnwath, Count Lockhart-Wischeart of the Holy Roman Empire, (1727 - 1790), was a Scottish aristocrat with a successful military career.

James Lockhart was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, the second son of a prominent Jacobite family, the Lockharts of Carnwath. His grandfather, George Lockhart, was the Scottish agent of James Francis Edward Stuart, the 'Old Pretender', and the author of the posthumously published 'Lockhart Papers'. These documents, including letters and George Lockhart's journal, comprise probably the most important primary source of information on the Jacobite rebellion of 1715.

Lockhart's elder brother, also named George, was the personal aide de camp to Charles Edward Stuart, the 'Young Pretender', during the Jacobite rising of 1745. Upon the defeat of the rebellion at the battle of Culloden, George Lockhart accompanied Prince Charles into exile in Paris. James Lockhart, his younger brother, was 18 years old at the time. As the son of a known Jacobite family—and a second son at that—James's prospects in Britain were bleak. He therefore left Scotland, aged 18, to make his way in the world as a soldier of fortune. His first service was as a common soldier in the army of Nadir Shah, the Shah of Persia. How James found his way to Persia is not known for certain. In A Memoir of the 'Forty-Five', (Chevalier de Johnstone, 1958), a Lockhart is mentioned who is probably James (p. 244). The passage is worth quoting in full:

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "James Lockhart."
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