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The almanac

UPI Almanac for Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, Sept. 7, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Sunday, Sept. 7, 2008.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, Sept. 7, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, Sept. 7, the 250th of 2006 with 115 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Sept. 7, the 250th of 2005 with 115 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Sept. 7, the 250th of 2005 with 115 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

The weekly UPI Almanac package for Sept. 5-11, 2005.
By United Press International

The Bear's Lair: The sound economy of 1929

WASHINGTON, Oct. 18 (UPI) -- Next Sunday, October 24, is the 75th anniversary of Black Thursday, the worst day of the Wall Street crash. Looking back from 2004, one is struck by how reasona
MARTIN HUTCHINSON

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, Sept. 7, the 251st day of 2004 with 115 to follow.
By United Press International

The Bear's Lair: Futile courtroom dramas

WASHINGTON, March 1 (UPI) -- The Martha Stewart trial and the approaching Jeffrey Skilling trial certainly provide soap-opera-style entertainment for the financial pages, but as the storylines get more complex, the doubts should grow: does all this courtroom activity actually benefit
MARTIN HUTCHINSON

The Bear's Lair: Greenspan's Ponzi Scheme

WASHINGTON, Nov. 24 (UPI) -- A Ponzi scheme requires three things in order to be (temporarily) successful: a massive source of outside money, a sophisticated PR campaign, bloviating about its glories, and a "magic mushroom" to make people believe in it. U.S. monetary policy currently
MARTIN HUTCHINSON, UPI Business and Economics Editor

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Sept. 7, the 250th day of 2003 with 115 to follow.
By United Press International

Assignment America: Big gorilla capitalism

NEW YORK, May 19 (UPI) -- The Big Gorilla Theory of Capitalism goes like this: We need selfish monomaniacal bulldog businessmen because they will keep the markets honest. We need their r
JOHN BLOOM, UPI Reporter-at-Large

Review: Save capitalism from economists!

WASHINGTON, April 30 (UPI) -- In the last half century, the University of Chicago has been a bastion of pro-market economics, producing a variant of free market economics that provided the theoretical underpinning for much of the rise in prosperity of the 1990s. As the 1990s proved to
MARTIN HUTCHINSON, UPI Business and Economics Editor
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Wiki

John Pierpont Morgan (April 17, 1837 – March 31, 1913) was an American financier, banker and art collector who dominated corporate finance and industrial consolidation during his time. In 1892 Morgan arranged the merger of Edison General Electric and Thompson-Houston Electric Company to form General Electric. After financing the creation of the Federal Steel Company he merged the Carnegie Steel Company and several other steel and iron businesses to form the United States Steel Corporation in 1901. He is widely credited with having saved or rescued the U.S. national economy in general—and the federal government in particular—on two separate occasions. He bequeathed much of his large art collection to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and to the Wadsworth Atheneum of Hartford, Connecticut. He died in Rome, Italy, in 1913 at the age of 75, leaving his fortune and business to his son, John Pierpont "Jack" Morgan, Jr.

J.P. Morgan was born in Hartford, Connecticut to Junius Spencer Morgan (1814–1891) and Juliet Pierpont (1816–1884) of Boston, Massachusetts. Pierpont, as he preferred to be known, had a varied education due in part to interference by his father, Junius. In the fall of 1848, Pierpont transferred to the Hartford Public School and then to the Episcopal Academy in Cheshire, Connecticut (now called Cheshire Academy), boarding with the principal. In September 1851, Morgan passed the entrance exam for the English High School of Boston, a school specializing in mathematics to prepare young men for careers in commerce.

In the spring of 1852, illness that was to become more common as his life progressed struck; rheumatic fever left him in so much pain that he could not walk. Junius booked passage for Pierpont straight away on the ship Io, owned by Charles Dabney, to the Azores (Northern Portuguese islands) in order for him to recover. After convalescing for almost a year, Pierpont returned to The English High School in Boston to resume his studies. After graduating, his father sent him to Bellerive, a school near the Swiss village of Vevey. When Morgan had attained fluency in French, his father sent him to the University of Göttingen in order to improve his German. Attaining a passable level of German within six months and also a degree in art history, Morgan traveled back to London via Wiesbaden, his education complete.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "J. Pierpont Morgan."
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