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A Blast From The Past

Today is March 11. Mikhail Gorbachev became leader of the Soviet Union on this date in 1985, succeeding Konstantin Chernenko. At 54, Gorbachev was much younger than his two immediate predecessors, ...
PENNY NELSON BARTHOLOMEW, United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, Feb. 23, the 54th day of 2002 with 311 to follow. The moon is waxing, moving toward its full phase.
By United Press International

A Blast From The Past

Today is Feb. 23. Researchers in Scotland introduced Dolly the cloned lamb to the world on this date in 1997.
PENNY NELSON BARTHOLOMEW, United Press International

Directors Guild honors Delbert Mann

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 22 (UPI) -- The Directors Guild of America has announced that Oscar-winning director Delbert Mann will be honored with the guild's Honorary Life Member Award at the upcomin
PAT NASON, UPI Hollywood Reporter

Of Human Interest: News-lite

BUT NO SNAKES Fourteen years ago, Alice Cooper and his wife, Sheryl, sat through a boring variety show at their daughter?s school, Hopi Elementary in Phoenix.
PENNY NELSON BARTHOLOMEW, United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, Feb. 19, the 50th day of 2002 with 315 to follow. The moon is waxing, moving toward its first quarter.
By United Press International

A Blast From The Past

, Feb. 19 (UPI) -- Today is Feb. 19. At dawn on this date in 1945, U.S. Marines began landing on the Japanese-held island of Iwo Jima, opening one of the bloodiest battles in the Pacific during World War II.
PENNY NELSON BARTHOLOMEW, United Press International

A Blast From The Past

Today is Feb. 18. Jefferson Davis was sworn in as provisional president of the Confederate States of America on this date in 1861.
PENNY NELSON BARTHOLOMEW, United Press International

Country Music News

TODAY IN COUNTRY MUSIC HISTORY
PENNY NELSON BARTHOLOMEW, United Press International

Today In Music: A look back at pop music

(Jan. 8)
PENNY NELSON BARTHOLOMEW, United Press International

Culture Vulture: The war you never saw

WASHINGTON, Jan. 4 (UPI) -- The war in Afghanistan will be remembered as the war you never saw.
CLAUDE SALHANI

Today In Music: A look back at pop music

(Jan. 5)
PENNY NELSON BARTHOLOMEW, United Press International

Sept. 11 on minds of World War II vets

NEW ORLEANS, Dec. 7 (UPI) -- Sept. 11 was on the minds of many World War II veterans who paraded Friday on the 60th anniversary of Pearl Harbor attack to mark the official opening of the Pa

Commentary: Pearl Harbor 60 years later

SAVANNAH, Ga., Dec. 6 (UPI) -- Surprise attacks 60 years apart produced America's worst military defeat and her most devastating man-made disaster, but there were only a few other similaritie
FRANK TREMAINE

Culture Vulture: War Film Gratification

WASHINGTON, Nov. 30 (UPI) -- As Western society advances ever more into a fast-paced world that demands instant gratification, it is easy to understand why war and action movies are increas
CLAUDE SALHANI
Page 8 of 9
Photos
Iwo Jima
The filming of "Flags of Our Fathers", a movie based on the life stories of the six men who raised the flag at the Battle of Iwo Jima, directed by Clint Eastwood, overtakes the Iwo Jima Memorial in Washington, on Aug. 8 2005. (UPI Photo/Kevin Dietsch)
Wiki

Iwo Jima, officially Iōtō (硫黄島?, listen (help·info): "sulfur island"), is an island of the Japanese Volcano Islands chain, which lie south of the Ogasawara Islands and together with them form the Ogasawara Archipelago. The island is located 650 nautical miles (750 mi; 1,200 km) south of mainland Tokyo and administered as part of Ogasawara, one of eight villages of Tokyo (but is presently uninhabited). It is famous as the setting of the February–March 1945 Battle of Iwo Jima between the United States and the Empire of Japan during World War II. The island grew in recognition in the west when the iconic photograph Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima was taken during the battle. The U.S. occupied Iwo Jima until 1968, when it was returned to Japan.

In 1779, the island was charted as Sulphur Island, the literal translation of its official name, during Captain James Cook's third surveying voyage.

Iwo Jima was traditionally called Iwōtō (Iōtō) by the Japanese. Before Japan's 1946 orthography reform, a historical spelling resulted in (approximately) Iwōtō (modern Iōtō). An alternative, Iwōjima (modern Iōjima)—where jima is an alternative pronunciation of tō (島, island?)—also appeared in nautical atlases. Japanese naval officers who arrived to fortify the island before the U.S. invasion mistakenly called it Iwo Jima. In this way, the "Iwo Jima" pronunciation became mainstream and was the one used by U.S. forces who arrived during World War II. Former island residents protested against this rendering, and the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport's Geographical Survey Institute debated the issue and formally announced on June 18, 2007, that the official Japanese pronunciation of the island's name would be reverted to the pre-war Iōtō. Moves to revert the pronunciation were sparked by the high profile films Flags of Our Fathers and Letters from Iwo Jima. The change does not affect how the name is written in kanji (硫黄島?), only how it is pronounced or written in hiragana, katakana and rōmaji.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Iwo Jima."
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