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The Almanac

Today is Monday, Nov. 11, the 315th day of 2001 with 50 to follow.
By United Press International

A Blast from the Past

Standing in the shadow of the World Trade Center ruins, on this date in 2001, President Bush and leaders of from around the world honored those who died in the terrorist attacks two months earlier. More than 80 nations were represented among the victims.
By United Press International

A Blast from the Past

The weekly UPI Blast from the Past package for Nov. 11-17.
By United Press International

Entertainment Today: Showbiz News

The New York Daily News says investigators in the Run-DMC homicide case are backing off the theory Jason Mizell's death was part of an East Coast-West Coast rap war.
KAREN BUTLER, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Ferdinand Joseph Lemott, better known to the music world as Jelly Roll Morton, was born this day in 1890. By the time he was 12 years old, he was playing ragtime piano in bordellos in the Storyville section of his native New Orleans.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Commentary: An immigrant's holiday

WASHINGTON, Oct. 12 (UPI) -- Ethnic pride and political correctness clash when the nation observes Columbus Day. Italian-Americans, who count Columbus as one of their own, view it as an opp
PETER ROFF, UPI National Political Analyst

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Drummer Art Blakey was born this day in 1919 in Pittsburgh. He became a one-man jazz university during his long and productive career. Blakey's band, The Jazz Messengers, became a training ground for many future bandleaders, including Jackie McLean, Johnn
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Case could strip Disney of Mickey

WASHINGTON, Oct. 9 (UPI) -- The Supreme Court heard argument Wednesday in case that should decide whether popular icons such as "The Wizard of Oz" and Mickey Mouse enter the public domain.
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Legal Affairs Correspondent

New Supreme Court term an enigma

WASHINGTON, Oct. 7 (UPI) -- Chief Justice William Rehnquist began the new term of the Supreme Court Monday with a startling slip of the tongue.
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Legal Affairs Correspondent

Today in Music: a look back at pop music

Today's birthdays include David Cloverdale of Deep Purple and also Whitesnake, who was born in 1951 (age 51); Debby Boone in 1956 (age 46); opera singer Andrea Bocelli in 1958 (age 44); and Joan Jett in 1960 (age 42).
By United Press International

A Blast from the Past

The British hanged the American Revolutionary War hero and patriot Nathan Hale on this day in 1776. His famous last words, although often misquoted, were: "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country." Hale had been caught spying behind
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2002 with 100 to follow.
By United Press International

On Law: High court can make or break you

WASHINGTON, Sept. 20 (UPI) -- Pin-striped appellate attorneys are sweating bullets onto their $600 Gucci shoes as the Supreme Court of the United States gets ready to say which of the summer
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Legal Affairs Correspondent

Today in Music: a look back at pop music

The weekly package of Today in Music for Sept. 21-27.
By United Press International

Today in Music: a look back at pop music

The weekly Today in Music package for Sept. 21-27.
By United Press International
Page 4 of 6
Photos
Irving Berlin
Composer and songwriter Irving Berlin photographed in 1968. (UPI Photo/Files)
Wiki

Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989) was an American composer and lyricist, widely considered one of the greatest songwriters in history.

His first hit song, "Alexander's Ragtime Band", became world famous. The song sparked an international dance craze in places as far away as Russia, which also "flung itself into the ragtime beat with an abandon bordering on mania." Over the years he was known for writing music and lyrics in the American vernacular: uncomplicated, simple and direct, with his aim being to "reach the heart of the average American" whom he saw as the "real soul of the country."

He wrote hundreds of songs, many becoming major hits, which made him "a legend" before he turned thirty. During his 60-year career he wrote an estimated 1,500 songs, including the scores for 19 Broadway shows and 18 Hollywood films, with his songs nominated eight times for Academy Awards. Many songs became popular themes and anthems, including "Easter Parade", "White Christmas", "Happy Holiday", "This is the Army, Mr. Jones", and "There's No Business Like Show Business". His Broadway musical and 1942 film, This is the Army, with Ronald Reagan, had Kate Smith singing Berlin's "God Bless America" which was first performed in 1938. After the September 11 attacks in 2001, Celine Dion recorded it as a tribute, making it #1 on the charts.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Irving Berlin."
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