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Documents show close friend joined interviews of Gov. Christie for internal review

Documents show close friend joined interviews of Gov. Christie for internal review

TRENTON, N.J., April 15 (UPI) -- Lawyers who investigated the "Bridgegate" scandal for New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie apparently did not record interviews, documents released this week show.
Frances Burns
Poll: More than half of N.J. voters say Christie's 'Bridgegate' report was 'whitewash'

Poll: More than half of N.J. voters say Christie's 'Bridgegate' report was 'whitewash'

HAMDEN, Conn., April 9 (UPI) -- More than half New Jersey voters say Chris Christie would not be a good president and they are split on whether he is a bully, Quinnipiac Poll finds.
Frances Burns

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Saturday, April 5, 2014.
By United Press International
Law firm that conducted 'Bridgegate' review paid $3.1M to represent New Jersey

Law firm that conducted 'Bridgegate' review paid $3.1M to represent New Jersey

March 31 (UPI) -- Law firm that did internal review of "Bridgegate" represented New Jersey on sports betting and got $3.1 million last year.
Frances Burns
Report distancing Christie from 'Bridgegate' says Kelly is scorned, 'emotional' woman

Report distancing Christie from 'Bridgegate' says Kelly is scorned, 'emotional' woman

March 28 (UPI) -- The recent report distancing N.J. Gov. Chris Christie from 'Bridgegate' also described the reported culprit Bridget Anne Kelly as an "emotional" woman.
Aileen Graef
Report: Christie was not aware of 'Bridgegate' lane closings in advance

Report: Christie was not aware of 'Bridgegate' lane closings in advance

March 27 (UPI) -- Law firm hired by Christie administration to review "Bridgegate" scandal finds governor unaware of lane closings in Fort Lee beforehand.
Frances Burns
Memphis hits final free-throws to overcome George Washington

Memphis hits final free-throws to overcome George Washington

Michael Dixon Jr. hit four critical free throws in the final 10 seconds that allowed Memphis to hold on for a 71-66 victory over George Washington.

UPI Sports Schedule for Friday, March 21

A roundup of the day's sporting events for March 21, 2014.
Caroline Lee
Christie asked about 'Bridgegate' during N.J. town hall meeting

Christie asked about 'Bridgegate' during N.J. town hall meeting

FLEMINGTON, N.J., March 20 (UPI) -- New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie got some more or less friendly questions about the "Bridgegate" scandal at a town hall meeting Thursday.

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Monday, March 17, 2014.
By United Press International

NCAA: St. Joseph's 65, VCU 61

Ronald Roberts Jr. and Halil Kanacevic both posted double-doubles and Saint Joseph's scored 65-61 win over No. 23 VCU on Sunday.

St. Joseph's edges out Dayton

Langston Galloway scored a 3-pointer in the final minute pushing Saint Joseph's to a 70-67 win over Dayton in the quarterfinals of the Atlantic 10 Tournament.

NCAA: Massachusetts 65, Rhode Island 61

Maxie Esho came off the bench to tally 15 points and grab seven rebounds as the Massachusetts Minutemen held on to defeat the Rhode Island Rams, 65-61.

Former Christie aide fighting 'Bridgegate' subpoena

TRENTON, N.J., March 11 (UPI) -- Lawyers for a former top aide to New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and a legislative committee debated Tuesday whether she must respond to a subpoena.
Christie ex-aides ask judge to quash subpoenas

Christie ex-aides ask judge to quash subpoenas

March 11 (UPI) -- Two former Chris Christie aides asked the federal judge investigating lane closures on the George Washington Bridge not to force them to turn over texts.
Gabrielle Levy
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George Washington (February 22, 1732  – December 14, 1799) was the dominant military and political leader of the new United States of America from 1775 to 1799. He led the American victory over Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army in 1775–1783, and presided over the writing of the Constitution in 1787. The unanimous choice to serve as the first President of the United States (1789–1797), Washington presided over the creation of a strong, well-financed national government that stayed neutral in the wars raging in Europe, suppressed rebellion and won acceptance among Americans of all types. His leadership style established many forms and rituals of government that have been used ever since, such as using a cabinet system and delivering an inaugural address. Washington is universally regarded as the "Father of his Country".

Washington was born into the provincial gentry of a wealthy, well connected Colonial Virginia family who owned tobacco plantations. After his father and older brother both died young, Washington became personally and professionally attached to the powerful Fairfax family, which promoted his career as a surveyor and soldier. Washington quickly became a senior officer of the colonial forces during the first stages of the French and Indian War. Chosen by the Second Continental Congress in 1775 to be commander-in-chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolution, he managed to force the British out of Boston in 1776, but was defeated and nearly captured later that year when he lost New York City. After crossing the Delaware River in the dead of winter, he defeated the enemy in two battles, retook New Jersey, and restored momentum to the Patriot cause. Because of his strategy, Revolutionary forces captured two major British armies at Saratoga in 1777 and Yorktown in 1781. Historians give Washington high marks for his selection and supervision of his generals, his encouragement of morale and ability to hold together the army, his coordination with the state governors and state militia units, his relations with Congress, and his attention to supplies, logistics, and training. In battle, however, Washington was repeatedly outmaneuvered by British generals with larger armies. After victory had been finalized in 1783, Washington resigned rather than seize power, proving his opposition to dictatorship and his commitment to the emerging American political ideology of republicanism. He returned to his home, Mount Vernon, and his domestic life there, continuing to manage a variety of enterprises. Washington's final 1799 will specified all his slaves be set free.

Dissatisfied with the weaknesses of Articles of Confederation, Washington presided over the Constitutional Convention that drafted the United States Constitution in 1787. Elected as the first President of the United States in 1789, he attempted to bring rival factions together to unify the nation. He supported Alexander Hamilton's programs to pay off all state and national debt, implement an effective tax system, and create a national bank, despite opposition from Thomas Jefferson. Washington proclaimed the U.S. neutral in the wars raging in Europe after 1793. He avoided war with Great Britain and guaranteed a decade of peace and profitable trade by securing the Jay Treaty in 1795, despite intense opposition from the Jeffersonians. Although never officially joining the Federalist Party, he supported its programs. Washington's "Farewell Address" was an influential primer on republican virtue and a stern warning against partisanship, sectionalism, and involvement in foreign wars.

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It uses material from the Wikipedia article "George Washington."
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