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UPI Almanac for Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014

UPI Almanac for Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014

UPI Almanac for Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, Sept. 4, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, Sept. 4, 2008.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, Sept. 4, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Monday, Sept. 4, the 247th day of 2006 with 118 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Sept. 4, the 247th day of 2005 with 118 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, Sept. 4, the 248th day of 2004 with 118 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, Sept. 4, the 247th day of 2003 with 118 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Sept. 4, the 247th day of 2002 with 118 to follow.
By United Press International
Wiki

François-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand (French pronunciation: ) (4 September 1768 – 4 July 1848) was a French writer, politician, diplomat and historian. He is considered the founder of Romanticism in French literature.

Born in Saint-Malo, the last of ten children, Chateaubriand grew up in his family's castle in Combourg, Brittany. His father, René de Chateaubriand (1718–86), was a former sea captain turned ship owner and slave trader. His mother's maiden name was Apolline de Bedée. Chateaubriand's father was a morose, uncommunicative man and the young Chateaubriand grew up in an atmosphere of gloomy solitude, only broken by long walks in the Breton countryside and an intense friendship with his sister Lucile.

Chateaubriand was educated in Dol, Rennes and Dinan. For a time he could not make up his mind whether he wanted to be a naval officer or a priest, but at the age of seventeen, he decided on a military career and gained a commission as a second lieutenant in the French Army based at Navarre. Within two years, he had been promoted to the rank of captain. He visited Paris in 1788 where he made the acquaintance of Jean-François de La Harpe, André Chénier, Louis-Marcelin de Fontanes and other leading writers of the time. When the French Revolution broke out, Chateaubriand was initially sympathetic, but as events in Paris became more violent he decided to journey to North America in 1791. This experience would provide the setting for his exotic novels Les Natchez (written between 1793 and 1799 but published only in 1826), Atala (1801) and René (1802). His vivid, captivating descriptions of nature in the sparsely settled American Deep South were written in a style that was very innovative for the time and spearheaded what would later become the Romantic movement in France. Later scholarship has cast doubt on Chateaubriand's claim that he had been granted an interview with George Washington or whether he actually lived for a time with the Native Americans he wrote about.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Francois Rene de Chateaubriand."
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