facebook
twitter
rss
account
search
search
Headlines
UPI Almanac for Friday, May 23, 2014

UPI Almanac for Friday, May 23, 2014

This is Friday, May 23, the 143rd day of 2014 with 222 to follow.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, May 23, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, May 23, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Saturday, May 23, 2009.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, May 23, 2008.
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Wednesday, May 23, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, May 23, the 143rd day of 2006 with 222 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, May 23, the 143rd day of 2006 with 222 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Monday, May 23, the 143rd day of 2005 with 222 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, May 23, the 144th day of 2004 with 222 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Friday, May 23, the 143rd day of 2003 with 222 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, May 23, the 143rd day of 2002 with 222 to follow.
By United Press International
Wiki

Coordinates: 32°43′07″N 79°53′05″W / 32.71861°N 79.88472°W / 32.71861; -79.88472

Fort Wagner (also called Battery Wagner) was a fortification on Morris Island, South Carolina, that covered the southern approach to Charleston harbor. It was the site of two American Civil War battles in the campaign known as Operations Against the Defenses of Charleston in 1863.

Named for deceased Lt. Col. Thomas M. Wagner, Fort Wagner measured 250 by 100 yards (91 m), and spanned an area between the Atlantic on the east and an impassable swamp on the west. Its walls, composed of sand and earth, rose 30 feet (9.1 m) above the level beach and were supported by palmetto logs and sandbags. The fort's arsenal included fourteen cannons, the largest a 10-inch (250 mm) Columbiad that fired a 128-pound shell. A large structure capable of sheltering nearly 1,000 of the fort's 1,700-man garrison provided substantial protection against naval shelling. The fort's land face was protected by a water-filled ditch, 10 feet (3.0 m) wide and 5 feet (1.5 m) deep, surrounded by buried land mines and sharpened palmetto stakes.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Fort Wagner."
Most Popular
1
Hundreds of cats take over island in New York
2
5-year-old girl in Idaho shot dead by another 5-year-old
3
Bachmann: Obama wants to use child immigrants for medical experiments
4
Christina Aguilera poses pregnant, nude for V Magazine
5
Ohio woman allegedly poops in front of Walgreens after being accused of shoplifting
x
Feedback