Headlines

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014.
By United Press International
Julie Harris, versatile actress on stage and screen, dead at 87

Julie Harris, versatile actress on stage and screen, dead at 87

CHATHAM, Mass., Aug. 25 (UPI) -- Actress Julie Harris, who played Joan of Arc and Mary Todd Lincoln on Broadway and starred on TV's "Knot's Landing," died Saturday in Chatham, Mass. She was 87.

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Monday, Jan. 16, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2008.
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Monday, Jan. 16, the 16th day of 2006 with 349 to go.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Jan.16, the 16th day of 2005 with 349 to go.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Friday, Jan. 16, the 16th day of 2004 with 350 to go.
By United Press International

Bernadette Peters, Broadway's Gypsy queen

NEW YORK, June 6 (UPI) -- Producers of the $8.5 million Broadway revival of "Gypsy" found the right prescription for success by casting Bernadette Peters in the role of Mama Rose, previo
FREDERICK M. WINSHIP

Feature: Another boost for musical comedy

LOS ANGELES, May 1 (UPI) -- Musical comedy, which is having a new heyday in Hollywood, is also getting a boost from a program that blends show business with education in U.S. schools.
PAT NASON, UPI Hollywood Reporter

Rock News: Music's high and low notes

New Orleans rock 'n' roll legend Fats Domino is the subject of a new DVD "Legends Of New Orleans: The Music of Fats Domino," on Shout! Factory/Song Music Entertainment.
JOHN SWENSON, United Press International

Today in Music: a look back at pop music

Today's birthdays include Brian Holland of the songwriting team Holland-Dozier-Holland, who was born in 1941 (age 62); Kinks drummer Mick Avory in 1944 (age 59); John Helliwell, saxophonist with Supertramp, in 1945 (age 58); Santana bassist David Brown in
By United Press International

Today In Music: a look back at pop music

The weekly UPI Today in Music package for Feb. 15-21.
By United Press International

Entertainment Today: Showbiz News

Al Pacino's new CIA thriller, "The Recruit," has commandeered the No. 1 spot at the box office from last weekend's top film, "Darkness Falls."
KAREN BUTLER, United Press International
Prev
Page 1 of 2
Wiki

Ethel Merman (January 16, 1908 – February 15, 1984) was an American actress and singer. Known primarily for her powerful voice and roles in musical theatre, she has been called "the undisputed First Lady of the musical comedy stage." Among the many standards introduced by Merman in Broadway musicals are "I Got Rhythm", "Everything's Coming Up Roses", "I Get a Kick Out of You", "It's De-Lovely", "Friendship", "You're the Top", "Anything Goes", and "There's No Business Like Show Business", which later became her theme song.

Merman was born Ethel Agnes Zimmermann in her maternal grandmother's house located at 26-5 4th Street in Astoria, Queens, in New York City in 1908, though she would later emphatically declare that it was actually 1912. Her father, Edward Zimmermann (1879–1977), was an accountant with James H. Dunham & Company, a Manhattan wholesale dry-goods company, and her mother, Agnes (née Gardner; 1883–1974), was a school teacher. Zimmermann had been raised in the Dutch Reformed Church and his wife was Presbyterian, but shortly after they were wed they joined the Episcopalian congregation at Church of the Redeemer, where Merman was baptized. Her parents were strict about church attendance, and every Sunday she spent the day there, first at morning services, followed by Sunday school, an afternoon prayer meeting, and an evening study group for children.

Merman attended P.S. 4 and William Cullen Bryant High School (which later named its auditorium in her honor), where she pursued a commercial course that offered secretarial training. She was active in numerous extracurricular activities, including the school magazine, the speakers' club, and student council, and she frequented the local music store to peruse the weekly arrivals of new sheet music. On Friday nights the Zimmermann family would take the subway into Manhattan to see the vaudeville show at the Palace Theatre, where Merman discovered Blossom Seeley, Fanny Brice, Sophie Tucker, and Nora Bayes. At home she would try to emulate their singing styles, but her own distinct voice was difficult to disguise.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Ethel Merman."
x
Feedback