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UPI Almanac for Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013.
By United Press International

Web site offers anonymous nagging

WEEHAWKEN, N.J., Aug. 15 (UPI) -- A New Jersey man has created a Web site that offers a stock of e-mail messages of constructive criticism that can be sent anonymously.

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Saturday, Oct. 27, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Friday, Oct. 27, 2006.
By United Press International

Watercooler Stories

U.S. Marines in Iraq carry culture cards... Self-timing eggs to debut in Britain... Headache remedy becomes pop culture phenom... Romance novel follows state candidate... Watercooler stories from UPI.
By United Press International

U.S. Marines in Iraq carry culture cards

BAGHDAD, July 31 (UPI) -- When it comes to etiquette, the U.S. Marine Corps has its own answer to Emily Post for members stationed in Iraq.

Watercooler Stories

Name change halts citizenship process... Developer offers $1M for each trailer... Church giving away house for New Year... Thank you cards the latest U.S. casualty... Watercooler stories from UPI.
By United Press International

Thank you cards the latest U.S. casualty

NEW YORK, Dec. 27 (UPI) -- The handwritten thank you card -- something first lady Jackie Kennedy raised to an art form in the 1960s -- is nearly a lost art in the United States.

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, Oct. 27, the 300th day of 2005 with 65 to follow.
By United Press International

Mail is better from your Valentine

WASHINGTON, Feb. 13 (UPI) -- When it comes to love and romance, Shakespeare's Romeo usually takes all the credit. Yet there is another man whose name is well known but whose story is not. H
HOLLI CHMELA

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Oct. 27, the 301st day of 2004 with 65 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Monday, Oct. 27, the 300th day of 2003 with 65 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Oct. 27, the 300th day of 2002 with 65 to follow.
By United Press International

Hot Buttons: Talk show topics

WHAT TO DO WITH UNCLE SCROOGE?
By United Press International

Feature: What to do with Uncle Scrooge?

LOS ANGELES, Dec. 20 (UPI) -- Every family has one. Everybody knows one. It's the parsimonious member of the clan who over the years has thrown cold water on holiday celebrations by doling out low-end Christmas gifts that in no way match their ability to pay or what they were given by
HIL ANDERSON
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Wiki

Emily Post (October 27, 1872 – September 25, 1960) was an American author on etiquette.

Post was born as Emily Price in Baltimore, Maryland, into privilege as the only daughter of architect Bruce Price and his wife Josephine Lee Price of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. She was educated at home and attended Miss Graham's finishing school in New York, where her family had moved. She met a prominent banker named Edwin Main Post, her husband-to-be, at a ball in one of Fifth Avenue’s elegant mansions. Following a fashionable wedding and a honeymoon tour of the Continent (1892), Mrs. Post’s first home was in New York’s Washington Square. The couple had two sons, Edwin Main Post, Jr. (1893) and Bruce Price Post (1895). The couple divorced in 1905, because of her husband's affairs with chorus girls and fledgling actresses, which had made him the target of blackmail.

When her two sons were old enough to attend boarding school, she turned her attention to writing. She produced newspaper articles on architecture and interior design, as well as stories and serials for such magazines as Harper's, Scribner's, and The Century, as well as light novels, including Flight of the Moth (1904), Purple and Fine Linen (1906), Woven in the Tapestry (1908), The Title Market (1909), and The Eagle's Feather (1910).

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Emily Post."
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