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UPI Almanac for Monday, March 3, 2014.
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UPI Almanac for Sunday, March 3, 2013.
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UPI Almanac for Saturday, March 3, 2012.
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UPI Almanac for Tuesday, March 3, 2009.
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UPI Almanac for Monday, March 3, 2008.
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UPI almanac for Saturday, March 3, 2007.
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Today is Friday, March 3, the 62nd day of 2006 with 303 to follow.
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Today is Wednesday, March 3, the 63rd day of 2004 with 303 to follow.
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Today is Monday, March 3, the 62nd day of 2003 with 303 to follow.
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The Almanac

Today is Sunday, March 3, the 62nd day of 2002 with 303 to follow. The moon is waning, moving toward its last quarter.
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Wiki

Edmund Waller, FRS (3 March 1606 – 21 October 1687) was an English poet and Politician.

Edmund Waller was the eldest son of Robert Waller of Coleshill, Herts, and Anne Hampden, his wife; thus he was first cousin to John Hampden. He was descended from the Waller family of Groombridge Place, Kent. Early in his childhood his father moved the family to Beaconsfield. Of Waller's early education all we know is his own account that he "was bred under several ill, dull and ignorant schoolmasters, until he went to Mr Dobson at Wycombe, who was a good schoolmaster and had been an Eton scholar." Robert Waller died in 1616, and Anne, a lady of rare force of character, sent him to Eton and to the University of Cambridge. He was admitted a fellow-commoner of King's College, Cambridge on 22 March 1620, he left without a degree. As a member of Parliament during the political turmoil of the 1640s, he was arrested for his part in a plot to establish London as a stronghold of the king; by betraying his colleagues and by lavish bribes, he avoided death. He later wrote poetic tributes to both Oliver Cromwell (1655) and Charles II (1660). Rejecting the dense intellectual verse of Metaphysical poetry, he adopted generalizing statement, easy associative development, and urbane social comment. With his emphasis on definitive phrasing through inversion and balance, he prepared the way for the emergence of the heroic couplet. By the end of the 17th century the heroic couplet was the dominant form of English poetry. Waller's lyrics include the well-known “Go, lovely Rose!”

It is believed that in 1621, at the age of only sixteen, he sat as member for Agmondesham (Amersham) in the last Parliament of James I. Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon says that Waller was "nursed in parliaments." In the parliament of 1624 he represented Ilchester, and in the first parliament of Charles I, Chipping Wycombe.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Edmund Waller."
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