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The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, Jan. 24, 2014.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, Jan. 24, 2008.
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, Jan. 24, the 24th day of 2006 with 341 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Monday, Jan. 24, the 24th day of 2005 with 341 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, Jan. 24, the 24th day of 2004 with 342 to follow.
By United Press International

'Molto Agitato' -- much ado at the Met

SAN DIEGO, Sept. 10 (UPI) -- I was familiar with the terms Iron Curtain, which described the communist countries in Eastern Europe, and even Bamboo Curtain, a term applied to communist Chin
SHIRLEY SAAD

'Paris in Mind' of 29 Americans

SAN DIEGO, Aug. 12 (UPI) -- "Paris in Mind," edited by Jennifer Lee, is a collection of essays, articles, letters and excerpts from books and diaries about Paris, by a variety of American
SHIRLEY SAAD

History (etc.) still inhabits Tarrytown

TARRYTOWN, N.Y., July 8 (UPI) -- One of our hallowed Fourth of July traditions is to go clomping around historic sites being reminded of things we should have remembered from freshman survey, t
JOHN BLOOM

Cooking: The literary art of asparagus

WASHINGTON, May 14 (UPI) -- Ex-pat American novelist Henry James, on a visit to Rye in East Sussex, England, fell in love with the Georgian house built in 1723 by its mayor, James Lamb. It
JULIA WATSON

The Almanac

Today is Friday, Jan. 24, the 24th day of 2003 with 341 to follow.
By United Press International

Book of the week: 'Something to Declare'

SANDIEGO, Calif., Dec. 10 (UPI) -- Reading Julian Barnes is like standing on a platform looking over everyone else's head. He reminds me of the tag line of old B.O.A.C. commercials: "Head and sho
SHIRLEY SAAD

Book Review: Women scorned write 'letters'

"Hell Hath No Fury: Women's Letters from the End of the Affair" presents numerous renderings of relationship finales, from the sublime to the ridiculous.
JESSIE THORPE
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Wiki

Edith Wharton, born Edith Newbold Jones (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937), was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer.

Wharton was born to George Frederic Jones and Lucretia Stevens Rhinelander in New York City. She had two brothers, Frederic Rhinelander and Henry Edward. The saying "Keeping up with the Joneses" is said to refer to her father's family. She shared a lifelong friendship with her Rhinelander niece, renowned landscape architect Beatrix Farrand of Reef Point in Bar Harbor, Maine, and often traveled with Henry James in Europe. Wharton combined her insider's view of America's privileged classes with a brilliant, natural wit to write humorous, incisive novels and short stories of social and psychological insight. She was well acquainted with many of her era's other literary and public figures, including Henry James and Theodore Roosevelt.

In 1885, at 23 years of age, she married Edward (Teddy) Robbins Wharton, who was 12 years her senior. From a well-established Boston family, he was a sportsman and a gentleman of her social class and shared her love of travel, although they had little in common intellectually. From the late 1880s until 1902, he suffered acute depression, and the couple ceased their extensive travel. At that time his depression manifested as a more serious disorder, after which they lived almost exclusively at The Mount, their estate designed by Edith Wharton. In 1908 her husband's mental state was determined to be incurable and she divorced him in 1913. In 1908 she began an affair with Morton Fullerton, a journalist for The Times, in whom she found an intellectual partner.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Edith Wharton."
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