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The Almanac

Today is Saturday, Jan. 19, the 19th day of 2002 with 346 to follow.
By United Press International

Thinking About Life: Biographies

CAMBRIDGE, England, Dec. 31 (UPI) -- Biographies and autobiographies, as everyone knows, are written accounts of individual lives. Usually the subjects are human beings though some non-human animal
JENNY TEICHMAN

Rock News: Music's high and low notes

'THE CONCERT FOR NEW YORK CITY': THE ALBUM
PENNY NELSON BARTHOLOMEW, United Press International

Entertainment Today: Showbiz news

LOU REED
By United Press International

Halloween draws nigh

WASHINGTON, Oct. 31 (UPI) -- Spooks and Goblins have begun to cluster on the Internet as Halloween is upon us.
TIMOTHY K. MALOY, UPI Correspondent

Joe Bob goes to the drive-in

GRAPEVINE, Texas, Oct. 24 (UPI) -- Last weekend I tooled up to Columbus, Ohio, for the annual 24-hour horror marathon at Studio 35 near the Ohio State campus, and the question everybody was askin

Living Today: Issues of modern living

THE ANTHRAX SCARE
By United Press International

Hot Buttons

CONGRESSMAN URGES SNIPER RIFLE BAN
By United Press International

Halloween going to Hell

With some malls canceling Halloween festivities and many parents planning to restrict their children's trick-or-treating this year, Halloween might as well be g
MARCELLA S. KREITER, United Press International
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Wiki

Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American writer, poet, editor and literary critic, considered part of the American Romantic Movement. Best known for his tales of mystery and the macabre, Poe was one of the earliest American practitioners of the short story and is considered the inventor of the detective-fiction genre. He is further credited with contributing to the emerging genre of science fiction. He was the first well-known American writer to try to earn a living through writing alone, resulting in a financially difficult life and career.

He was born as Edgar Poe in Boston, Massachusetts; he was orphaned young when his mother died shortly after his father abandoned the family. Poe was taken in by John and Frances Allan, of Richmond, Virginia, but they never formally adopted him. He attended the University of Virginia for one semester but left due to lack of money. After enlisting in the Army and later failing as an officer's cadet at West Point, Poe parted ways with the Allans. His publishing career began humbly, with an anonymous collection of poems, Tamerlane and Other Poems (1827), credited only to "a Bostonian".

Poe switched his focus to prose and spent the next several years working for literary journals and periodicals, becoming known for his own style of literary criticism. His work forced him to move between several cities, including Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York City. In Baltimore in 1835, he married Virginia Clemm, his 13-year-old cousin. In January 1845 Poe published his poem "The Raven" to instant success. His wife died of tuberculosis two years after its publication. He began planning to produce his own journal, The Penn (later renamed The Stylus), though he died before it could be produced. On October 7, 1849, at age 40, Poe died in Baltimore; the cause of his death is unknown and has been variously attributed to alcohol, brain congestion, cholera, drugs, heart disease, rabies, suicide, tuberculosis, and other agents.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Edgar Allan Poe."
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