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The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Dec. 31, the 365th and last day of 2003.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, May 1, the 121st day of 2003 with 244 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Jan. 1, the first day of 2003. There are 364 days to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, May 1, the 121st day of 2002 with 244 to follow. This is May Day. The moon is waning, moving toward its last quarter.
By United Press International

The New Library of Alexandria

ALEXANDRIA, Egypt, April 3 (UPI) -- "The sights of Alexandria are in themselves not interesting, but they fascinate when we approach them through the past," wrote E.M. Forster in his 1922 book, "A
PHILIPPA SCOTT

The Bear's Lair: Parasitic services- II

WASHINGTON, March 19 (UPI) -- In this two part analysis, I ask a question which may have serious implications for the U.S. economy: are there now some service industries that are parasitic on the U.S. economy, so that their output should be subtracted from rather than added to Gross D
MARTIN HUTCHINSON, Business and Economics Editor

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, Jan. 1, the first day of 2002. There are 364 days to follow.
By United Press International
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Wiki

Edward Morgan Forster OM, CH (1 January 1879 – 7 June 1970), was an English novelist, short story writer, essayist and librettist. He is known best for his ironic and well-plotted novels examining class difference and hypocrisy in early 20th-century British society. Forster's humanistic impulse toward understanding and sympathy may be aptly summed up in the epigraph to his 1910 novel Howards End: "Only connect".

Forster was born into an Anglo-Irish and Welsh middle-class family at 6 Melcombe Place, Dorset Square, London NW1, in a building that no longer exists. He was the only child of Edward Morgan Llewellyn Forster and Alice Clara "Lily" (née Whichelo). His father, an architect, died of consumption on 30 October 1880. Among Forster's ancestors were members of the Clapham Sect. He inherited £8,000 (£659,300 as of 2011), from his paternal great-aunt Marianne Thornton (daughter of the abolitionist Henry Thornton), who died on 5 November 1887. The money was enough to live on and enabled him to become a writer. He attended the famous public school Tonbridge School in Kent as a day boy. The theatre at the school is named after him.

At King's College, Cambridge, between 1897 and 1901, he became a member of a discussion society known as the Apostles (formally named the Cambridge Conversazione Society). Many of its members went on to constitute what came to be known as the Bloomsbury Group, of which Forster was a peripheral member in the 1910s and 1920s. There is a famous recreation of Forster's Cambridge at the beginning of The Longest Journey.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "E.M. Forster."
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