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Texas Rangers vs. Mariners in Seattle.
Texas Rangers' rookie pitcher Derek Holland is relieved in the seventh inning at SAFECO Field in Seattle on July 12, 2009. The Mariners beat the Rangers 5-3 to take three out of four games. (UPI Photo/Jim Bryant)
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Derek Holland is a figure on the European far-right noted for his Catholic Integralism.

Holland was born on ???and bought up in Huntingdon and was already trying to recruit new members to the National Front while a student at Cambridgeshire College of Art and Technology. He then went to Leicester Polytechnic to study History and to bolster support for the already-established Young National Front Student Organisation. After his studies Holland became closely associated with the Political Soldier wing of the party. One of the party's main writers in a time when their ideology was shifting, he contributed regularly not only to the party journal Nationalism Today, but was also co-editor of Rising, a radical nationalist journal that was independent of the NF and drew heavily from Julius Evola and Corneliu Zelea Codreanu. Holland became one of the leading lights on the Political Soldier wing of the party when his pamphlet The Political Soldier was published in 1984. Along with Nick Griffin and Patrick Harrington he became effective joint leader of the Official National Front following the resignation of Andrew Brons from overall leadership in 1984. In 1988 the three travelled to Libya on a fund-raising trip as an official representatives of the NF, although in the end they were given only copies of The Green Book.

In 1989 Holland broke with Patrick Harrington and joined Michael Fishwick in following Nick Griffin and Roberto Fiore into the International Third Position (ITP) after Harrington had contacted The Jewish Chronicle with regards to opening dialogue. Holland injected his sympathies for anti-Zionist groups, as part of his nationalist philosophy, into the ITP. He supported the ideas of Muammar al-Gaddafi and Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, who had previously featured on a cover of National Front News.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Derek Holland."
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