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Brubeck jams with 12-year-old at festival

HARTFORD, Conn., Aug. 10 (UPI) -- Famed jazz pianist Dave Brubeck took time during the Litchfield Jazz Festival in Connecticut to play alongside a 12-year-old saxophonist, the boy says.

Playboy Jazz Festival's silver weekend

LOS ANGELES, June 13 (UPI) -- The 25th annual Playboy Jazz Festival is scheduled Saturday and Sunday at the Hollywood Bowl and will include funnyman and occasional drummer Bill Cosby.

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Bass player Eugene Wright was born this day in 1923. He signed on with the Dave Brubeck Quartet in 1958, where his solid timekeeping became the base for Brubeck's experiments with polyrhythms and unusual time signatures.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Trumpeter Booker Little was born this day in 1938 in Memphis. He recorded with Max Roach, Eric Dolphy and John Coltrane, and led his own group at New York's Five Spot three months before his death in 1961.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

The father of modern jazz guitar was born this day in 1919 in Dallas. Charlie Christian's recording career lasted only three years, but what an impact he had on later generations.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Cornetist Ruby Braff was born this day in Boston in 1927. When he hit the jazz scene strong in the 1950s, his Armstrong-style playing was considered out of date. He died last month on Cape Cod.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Cornetist Jimmy McPartland was born in Chicago this day in 1907. He died in 1991.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Pianist Willie "the Lion" Smith was born this date in 1897 in Goshen, N.Y. He was one of the top Stride pianists on the New York jazz scene from the 1930s into the 1970s. He died in 1973.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Big band trumpeter Ray Wetzel was born this day in 1924 in Parkersburg, W.Va. He was lead trumpeter in the big bands of Woody Herman, Stan Kenton, Tommy Dorsey and with the Metronome All-Stars. He died in an auto accident in Colorado in 1951.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Singer Velma Middleton was born this day in 1917 in St. Louis. She sang with Louis Armstrong's big band and his all-stars starting in the 1940s. She died in Sierra Leone in 1961 while touring Africa with Armstrong.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Trumpeter Kenny Dorham, a brilliant player and fine composer, was born this day in 1924 in Fairfield, Texas. He followed Miles Davis in the Charlie Parker quintet, was a co-founder of the Jazz Messengers and briefly led his own similar group, the Jazz Pro
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Pianist Vince Guaraldi was born this day in 1928 in San Francisco. He won a Grammy in 1962 for writing "Cast Your Fate to the Wind." But he was best known for the jazz-oriented scores he wrote for the "Charlie Brown" television specials. Guaraldi died in
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Pianist Billy Kyle was born this day in 1914 in Philadelphia. He was a sideman in Louis Armstrong's band from 1953 until his death in 1966.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Drummer Elmer "Mousey" Alexander was born this day in 1922 in Gary, Ind. He worked in Dixieland bands in Chicago in the late 1940s before moving to New York where he performed for a year as a member of pianist Marian McPartland's bebop trio. His longest a
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Pianist Elmo Hope was born this day in 1923 in New York. Classical piano studies and rhythm and blues tours preceded his shift into jazz in the 1950s when he recorded with Sonny Rollins, Lou Donaldson and Jackie McLean and Clifford Brown for the Blue Note
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International
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Dave Brubeck Quartet
Wiki

The Dave Brubeck Quartet was a jazz quartet, founded in 1951 by Dave Brubeck and featuring Paul Desmond on saxophone and Brubeck on piano. They took up a long residency at San Francisco's Blackhawk nightclub and gained great popularity touring college campuses, releasing a series of albums with such titles as Jazz at Oberlin, Jazz Goes to College, and Jazz Goes to Junior College.

By 1958, after a handful of different drummers and bassists, the "Classic Quartet" — so-called because it remained as such virtually consistently until the group dissolved — had been assembled; consisting of Brubeck, Desmond, Joe Morello on drums, and Eugene Wright on bass. In 1959, the Dave Brubeck Quartet released Time Out, an album their label was enthusiastic about but nonetheless hesitant to release. The album contained all original compositions, almost none of which were in common time. Nonetheless, on the strength of these unusual time signatures (the album included "Take Five", "Blue Rondo à la Turk", and "Pick Up Sticks"), it quickly went platinum. The quartet followed up its success with several more albums in the same vein, including Time Further Out (1961), Countdown: Time in Outer Space, Time Changes, and Time In. These albums were also known for using contemporary paintings as cover art, featuring the work of Neil Fujita on Time Out, Joan Miró on Time Further Out, Franz Kline on Time in Outer Space, and Sam Francis on Time Changes. No artist work, however, was featured on the cover of Time In. A high point for the group was their classic 1963 live album At Carnegie Hall, described by critic Richard Palmer as "arguably Dave Brubeck's greatest concert".

The Dave Brubeck Quartet broke up in 1967, except for a 25th anniversary reunion in 1976.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Dave Brubeck Quartet."
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