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COLORADO ROCKIES VS HOUSTON ASTROS
Houston Astros second baseman Craig Biggio (L) hugs his son Conor Joseph Biggio while celebrating his 3,000th career hit in the seventh inning against the Colorado Rockies at Minute Maid Park in Houston on June 28, 2007. Biggio was credited with a single as he was tagged out trying to stretch his hit into a double. (UPI Photo/Aaron M. Sprecher)
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Craig Alan Biggio (born December 14, 1965 in Smithtown, New York) is a former Major League Baseball second baseman, catcher, and outfielder. He played his entire 20-year baseball career with the Houston Astros (1988–2007). He ranks 20th all-time with 3,060 career hits, and is the ninth player in the 3000 hit club to get all his hits with the same team. He is currently the head varsity baseball coach for St. Thomas High School in Houston, Texas.

Craig Biggio graduated from Kings Park High School on Long Island, New York, where he excelled as a multi-sport varsity athlete. Most notably, after the 1983 season, Biggio was awarded the Hansen Award, which recognized him as being the best football player in Suffolk County. However, Biggio's passion lay with baseball, such that he turned down football scholarships for the opportunity to play baseball for Seton Hall University.

An infielder in school, Biggio switched to catcher at Seton Hall University because his team needed one. Biggio was an All-American baseball player at Seton Hall, where he played with other future Major League Baseball stars Mo Vaughn and John Valentin. Biggio, Vaughn and Valentin, along with Marteese Robinson, were featured in the book The Hit Men and the Kid Who Batted Ninth by David Siroty which chronicled their rise from college teammates to the major leagues. Biggio was drafted by the Houston Astros in the first round (22nd overall) in 1987.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Craig Biggio."
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