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The almanac

UPI Almanac for Saturday Sept. 14, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, Sept. 14, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2011.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Sunday, Sept. 14, 2008.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, Sept. 14, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, Sept. 14, the 257th day of 2006 with 108 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Sept. 14, the 257th day of 2005 with 108 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, Sept. 14, the 258th day of 2004 with 108 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Sept. 14, the 257th day of 2003 with 108 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, Sept. 14, the 257th day of 2002 with 108 to follow.
By United Press International

Washington Agenda-Federal

For content questions, call 202-898-8291
By United Press International

Caricaturist Al Hirschfeld honored

NEW YORK, Jan. 17 (UPI) -- Caricaturist Al Hirschfeld, so-called chairman of the drawing board, has just been accorded exhibitions on both coasts for documenting the glitterati of New Yor
FREDERICK M. WINSHIP
Wiki

Charles Dana Gibson (September 14, 1867 – December 23, 1944) was an American graphic artist, best known for his creation of the Gibson Girl, an iconic representation of the beautiful and independent American woman at the turn of the 20th century.

Gibson was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts to Charles DeWolf Gibson and Josephine Elizabeth Lovett. He was the great-grandson of U.S. Senator James DeWolf and the great-great-grandson of U.S. Senator William Bradford. A talented youth, he was enrolled by his parents in New York's Art Students League, where he studied for two years.

Peddling his pen-and-ink sketches, he sold his first work in 1886 to John Ames Mitchell's Life. His works appeared weekly in the magazine for over 30 years. He quickly built a wider reputation, his works appearing in all the major New York publications, Harper's Weekly, Scribners and Collier's. His illustrated books include the 1898 editions of Anthony Hope's The Prisoner of Zenda and its sequel Rupert of Hentzau. The development of the Gibson Girl from 1890 and her nationwide fame made Gibson respected and wealthy.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Charles Dana Gibson."
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