account
search
search
Jump to
Latest Headlines Wiki
share with facebook
share with twitter
share with google
1 of 2
The Bohemian Caverns in Washington
The Bohemian Caverns music club is seen in Washington on August 15, 2009. The club, opened in 1926, has hosted jazz legends Duke Ellington, Cab Calloway, Billy Holiday, Sarah Vaughn, Louis Armstrong, and others. UPI/Alexis C. Glenn
| License Photo
Latest Headlines
First Prev Page 1 of 5 Last Next
Wiki

Cabell "Cab" Calloway III (December 25, 1907 – November 18, 1994) was an American jazz singer and bandleader.

Calloway was a master of energetic scat singing and led one of the United States' most popular African American big bands from the start of the 1930s through the late 1940s. Calloway's band featured performers including trumpeters Dizzy Gillespie and Adolphus "Doc" Cheatham, saxophonists Ben Webster and Leon "Chu" Berry, New Orleans guitar ace Danny Barker, and bassist Milt Hinton. Calloway continued to perform until his death in 1994 at the age of 86.

Cab Calloway was born in a middle-class family in Rochester, New York, on Christmas in 1907 and lived there until 1918, on Sycamore Street. He was later raised in Baltimore, Maryland. His father, Cabell Calloway II, was a lawyer and his mother, Martha Eulalia Reed, was a teacher and church organist. When Cab was young, he enjoyed singing in church. His parents recognized their son's musical talent and he began private voice lessons in 1922. He continued to study music and voice throughout his formal schooling. Despite his parents' and vocal teachers' disapproval of jazz, Calloway began frequenting and eventually performing in many of Baltimore's jazz clubs, where he was mentored by drummer Chick Webb and pianist Johnny Jones.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Cab Calloway."
x
Feedback