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Florida Panthers vs. Washington Capitals
Washington Capitals head coach Bruce Boudreau celebrates their 3-1 win over the Florida Panthers, giving the Caps the Southeast Division Championship and a slot in the playoffs, at the Verizon Center in Washington on April 5, 2008. Boudreau took over the last-place Caps in late November, turned the team around and led them on a seven-game winning streak to end the season and put them in the Stanley Cup playoffs. In front of Boudreau are forwards Brooks Laich and Alex Ovechkin, of Russia. (UPI Photo/Roger L. Wollenberg)
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Bruce Allan Boudreau (born January 9, 1955) is a Canadian professional ice hockey head coach who currently coaches the Washington Capitals of the National Hockey League (NHL). As a player, Boudreau played professionally for 20 seasons, logging 141 games in the NHL and 30 games in the World Hockey Association (WHA). He played for the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Chicago Black Hawks of the NHL and the Minnesota Fighting Saints of the WHA. Boudreau won the Jack Adams Award for the NHL's most outstanding head coach in the 2007-08 NHL season.

While Boudreau's major professional career was modest, he had a long career in the minor leagues, and was one of the most prolific minor league scorers of all time, largely in the American Hockey League (AHL). His junior career was spent with the Toronto Marlboros of the Ontario Hockey Association (OHA), for which he averaged over 100 points a season. He scored 165 points in his final season in juniors, adding 44 points in 27 games en route to captaining the Marlies to a Memorial Cup championship. He was awarded the Eddie Powers Memorial Trophy as the top goal scorer for the 1974–75 OMJHL season.

After being drafted in the third round, 42nd overall, by the Toronto Maple Leafs, Boudreau could not agree with Toronto on a contract and joined the Minnesota Fighting Saints of the WHA, making his professional debut in 1975.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Bruce Boudreau."
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