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CABARET PERFORMER BOBBY SHORT DIES AT 80
Cabaret performer Bobby Short reknown for his embodiment of New York style and sophistication and a fixture at Carlyle Hotel for the past 35 years died on March 21, 2005 at the age of 80. (UPI Photo/file/Ezio Petersen)
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Robert Waltrip "Bobby" Short (September 15, 1924 – March 21, 2005) was an American cabaret singer and pianist, best known for his interpretations of songs by popular composers of the first half of the 20th century such as Rodgers and Hart, Cole Porter, Jerome Kern, Harold Arlen, Vernon Duke, Noel Coward and George and Ira Gershwin.

He also championed African-American composers of the same period such as Eubie Blake, James P. Johnson, Andy Razaf, Fats Waller, Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn, presenting their work not in a polemical way, but as simply the obvious equal of that of their white contemporaries.

His dedication to his great love – what he called the "Great American Song" – left him equally adept at performing the witty lyrics of Bessie Smith's "Gimme a Pigfoot" or Gershwin and Duke's "I Can't Get Started."

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Bobby Short."
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