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CLEAN ENERGY AND DEVELOPMENT WORLD BANK MEETING
World Bank Chief Scientist Bob Watson answers a question at a press briefing on clean energy and development towards an investment framework, at the International Monetary Fund in Washington on April 23, 2006. Watson was joined by World Bank's Acting Vice President for Sustainable Development Steen Jorgensen. (UPI Photo/Kevin Dietsch)
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Robert Jose Watson (born April 10, 1946 in Los Angeles, California) is a former first baseman for the Houston Astros, Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees and Atlanta Braves from 1966-1984, and currently serves as Major League Baseball's vice president of rules and on-field operations.

Nicknamed "Bull," Watson was originally a catcher in the minor leagues, however, he converted to first base and the outfield by the time he made his major league debut with the Astros on September 9, 1966. Watson was a dependable hitter whose home run numbers were somewhat hurt by the fact that he played the majority of his career in the Astrodome.

Watson was credited with scoring the 1,000,000th run in major league history on May 4, 1975 at 12:32 in the afternoon. Watson scored from second base on a three-run homer by teammate Milt May at San Francisco's Candlestick Park. It was known that the 999,999th run had already scored, with sponsored updates being provided by and to every ballpark. Despite the lack of in-game urgency, Watson ran at full speed, reaching home plate approximately four seconds before Dave Concepción, who had just homered in Cincinnati and was also racing around the basepaths. "I never ran so fast in my entire life," said Concepcion. But it was Watson who won $10,000 and one million Tootsie Rolls provided by the event's sponsor. The 1,000,000th run total only included runs scored in the National and American Leagues (not "3rd" major leagues, such as the Federal League). Watson joked that in the aftermath of the event, his fan mail doubled—from 4 letters to 8. Later, more accurate recalculations of baseball's record-keeping showed that neither Watson nor Concepcion scored baseball's actual millionth run, and it is not known who did.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Bob Watson."
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