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Bob Crosby (August 23, 1913, Spokane, Washington – March 9, 1993, La Jolla, California) was an American dixieland bandleader and vocalist, best known for his group Crosby and the Bob-Cats.

He was the youngest of seven children: five boys, Larry (1895-1975), Everett (1896-1966), Ted (1900-1973), Harry (1903-1977, popularly known as Bing Crosby) and Bob; and two girls, Catherine (1905-1988) and Mary Rose (1907-1990). His parents were English-American bookkeeper Harry Lowe Crosby (1871-1950) and Irish-American Catherine Harrigan (1873-1964), (affectionately known as Kate), the daughter of a builder from County Mayo in Ireland.

Bob Crosby began singing with Anson Weeks (1931-34) and the Dorsey Brothers (1934-35). He led his first band in 1935, when the former members of Ben Pollack's band elected him as titular leader. His most famous band, the Bob-Cats, was a Dixieland jazz group with members from the Bob Crosby Orchestra. Both the Bob Crosby Orchestra and the smaller Bob-Cats group specialized in Dixieland jazz, presaging the traditional jazz revival of the 1940s. Crosby's singing voice was remarkably similar to that of his brother Bing, but without its range.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Bob Crosby."
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