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The almanac

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, June 19, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, June 19, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, June 19, 2008.
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Tuesday, June 19, 2007.

The Almanac

Today is Monday June 19, the 170th day of 2006 with 195 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, June 19, the 170th day of 2005 with 195 to follow.
By United Press International

The Bear's Lair: Houses of cards

WASHINGTON, Aug. 23 (UPI) -- Earnings restatements by both Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and last week a "Wells notice" from the Securities and Exchange Commission to Freddie Mac suggest that
MARTIN HUTCHINSON

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, June 19, the 171st day of 2004 with 195 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, June 19, the 170th day of 2003 with 195 to follow.
By United Press International

The Bear's Lair: Risky risk management

WASHINGTON, April 21 (UPI) -- In the last 20 years, the term "risk management" has come into general use, reflecting a belief by financial sector managers that a business's risks can be "managed" by appropriate mathematical techniques. Regrettably, the techniques are faulty, and relia
MARTIN HUTCHINSON, UPI Business and Economics Editor

The Bear's Lair: Copy wrongs, Part I

WASHINGTON, Feb. 3 (UPI) -- Property rights are a fuzzy concept, not an absolute. At one extreme, George, first Duke of Sutherland in the early 19th century, depopulated half Scotland to replace tenants with sheep -- that is the attitude of the Disney-lobbied copyright bill that ext
MARTIN HUTCHINSON, UPI Business and Economics Editor

The almanac

Today is Wednesday, June 19, the 170th day of 2002 with 195 to follow.
By United Press International

Sermon of the week: Grandeur and misery

WASHINGTON, Feb. 16 (UPI) -- In this 46th installment of the UPI series of sermons, the Rev. Dr. Robert Imbelli, who teaches theology at Boston College, reflects on the human condition and the season of Lent.
THE REV. ROBERT IMBELLI
Wiki

Blaise Pascal (French pronunciation: ; June 19, 1623 – August 19, 1662), was a French mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer and Catholic philosopher. He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father, a Tax Collector in Rouen. Pascal's earliest work was in the natural and applied sciences where he made important contributions to the study of fluids, and clarified the concepts of pressure and vacuum by generalizing the work of Evangelista Torricelli. Pascal also wrote in defense of the scientific method.

In 1642, while still a teenager, he started some pioneering work on calculating machines, and after three years of effort and 50 prototypes he invented the mechanical calculator. He built twenty of these machines (called the Pascaline) in the following ten years. Pascal was a mathematician of the first order. He helped create two major new areas of research. He wrote a significant treatise on the subject of projective geometry at the age of sixteen, and later corresponded with Pierre de Fermat on probability theory, strongly influencing the development of modern economics and social science. Following Galileo and Torricelli, in 1646 he refuted Aristotle's followers who insisted that nature abhors a vacuum. His results caused many disputes before being accepted.

In 1646, he and his sister Jacqueline identified with the religious movement within Catholicism known by its detractors as Jansenism. His father died in 1651. Following a mystical experience in late 1654, he had his "second conversion", abandoned his scientific work, and devoted himself to philosophy and theology. His two most famous works date from this period: the Lettres provinciales and the Pensées, the former set in the conflict between Jansenists and Jesuits. In this year, he also wrote an important treatise on the arithmetical triangle. Between 1658 and 1659 he wrote on the cycloid and its use in calculating the volume of solids.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Blaise Pascal."
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