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The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Frriday, Sept. 12, 2008.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, Sept. 12, the 255th day of 2006 with 110 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Monday, Sept. 12, the 255h day of 2005 with 110 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Sept. 12, the 256th day of 2004 with 110 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Friday, Sept. 12, the 255th day of 2003 with 110 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, Sept. 12, the 255th day of 2001 with 110 to follow.
By United Press International

Scott's World -- UPI Arts & Entertainment

HOLLYWOOD, April 23 (UPI) -- Time was when movie stars weren't reclusive millionaires hiding from the public. It existed during Hollywood's Golden Age, roughly the 1920s to the 1950s, when
VERNON SCOTT, United Press International
Wiki

Ben Blue (September 12, 1901 – March 7, 1975), born Benjamin Bernstein, was a Canadian-American actor and comedian.

In the 1920s Bernstein joined a popular orchestra, Jack White and His Montrealers. The entire band emphasized comedy, and would continually interact with the joke-cracking maestro. Blue, the drummer, would sometimes deliver corny jokes while wearing a ridiculously false beard. The band emigrated to the United States, and appeared in two early sound musicals: the Vitaphone short subject Jack White and His Montrealers and Universal's feature-length Technicolor revue King of Jazz.

Blue left the band to establish himself as a solo comedian, portraying a bald-headed dumb-bell with a goofy expression. Producer Hal Roach featured him in his "Taxi Boys" comedy shorts, but Blue's dopey character was an acquired taste and he was soon replaced by other comedians. Later in the 1930s he worked at Paramount Pictures, notably in The Big Broadcast of 1938, and later at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. In 1950, he had his own short-lived TV series, The Ben Blue Show, and was also a regular on The Frank Sinatra Show.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Ben Blue."
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