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The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, May 2, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, May 2, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Saturday, May 2, 2009.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, May 2, 2008.
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Wednesday, May 2, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, May 3, the 123rd day of 2006 with 242 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, May 3, the 123rd day of 2005 with 242 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Monday, May 3, the 124th day of 2004 with 242 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, May 3, the 123rd day of 2003 with 242 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Friday, May 3, the 123rd day of 2002 with 242 to follow. The moon is waning, moving toward its last quarter. There are no morning stars.
By United Press International
Wiki

Engelbert Humperdinck (born Arnold George Dorsey; 2 May 1936) is a pop singer, best known for his hits including "Release Me (And Let Me Love Again)" and "After the Lovin'" as well as "The Last Waltz" ("The Last Waltz with You"). As Arnold Dorsey, Humperdinck was one of ten children born in Madras, India, to British Army officer Mervyn Dorsey and his wife Olive. His mother and father were themselves both British and Anglo Indian. His family moved to Leicester, England, when he was 10, and a year later he showed an interest in music and began learning the saxophone. He started work as an apprentice engineer and by the early 1950s he was playing the instrument in nightclubs, but he is believed not to have tried singing until he was 17 and friends coaxed him into entering a pub contest. His impression of Jerry Lewis prompted friends to begin calling him "Gerry Dorsey," a name he worked under for almost a decade.

Though Dorsey's music career was interrupted by his national service in the British Army Royal Corps of Signals during the middle 1950s, he got his first chance to record in 1958 with the Decca Records label after his discharge. His first single, "I'll Never Fall in Love Again," was not a hit, but Dorsey would record for the same company almost a decade later with very different results. Dorsey continued working the nightclubs until 1961, when he was stricken with tuberculosis. He regained his health and returned to nightclub work, but with little success.

In 1965, Dorsey teamed with his former roommate, Gordon Mills, who had become a music impresario and the manager of Tom Jones. Aware that Dorsey had been struggling for several years to become successful in the music industry, Mills suggested a name-change to the more arresting Engelbert Humperdinck, borrowed from the 19th-century composer of such operas as Hansel and Gretel. Mills also arranged a new deal for him with Decca Records.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Arnold Dorsey."
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