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Walter Cronkite shares laugh with columnist Ann Landers
Former CBS news anchor Walter Cronkite shares a laugh with columnist Ann Landers during a roast for Cronkite at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington on May 7, 1986. (UPI Photo/Doug Mills/Files)
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Ann Landers was a pen name created by Chicago Sun-Times advice columnist Ruth Crowley in 1943 and taken over by Eppie Lederer in 1955. For 56 years, the Ask Ann Landers syndicated advice column was a regular feature in many newspapers across North America. Due to this popularity, 'Ann Landers', though fictional, became something of a national institution and cultural icon.

The creator of the 'Ann Landers' pseudonym was Ruth Crowley, a Chicago nurse who had been writing a child-care column for the Sun since 1941. She chose the pseudonym at random — borrowing the surname 'Landers' from a family friend — in order to prevent confusion between her two columns. Unlike Lederer, Crowley kept her identity as Landers secret, even enjoining her children to help her keep it quiet. Crowley took a three-year break from writing the column from 1948 until 1951. After 1951 she continued the column for the Chicago Sun-Times and in syndication (since 1951) to 26 other newspapers until her death, aged 48, on July 20, 1955. Crowley spent a total of nine years writing advice as 'Ann Landers'.

In the three-month period after Crowley’s death, various writers, including Connie Chancellor, took over the column.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Ann Landers."
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