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UPI Almanac for Thursday, May 23, 2013.
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UPI Almanac for Wednesday, May 23, 2012.
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UPI Almanac for Saturday, May 23, 2009.
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UPI Almanac for Friday, May 23, 2008.
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UPI almanac for Wednesday, May 23, 2007.
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The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, May 23, the 143rd day of 2006 with 222 to follow.
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The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, May 23, the 143rd day of 2006 with 222 to follow.
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The Almanac

Today is Monday, May 23, the 143rd day of 2005 with 222 to follow.
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Today is Sunday, May 23, the 144th day of 2004 with 222 to follow.
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The Almanac

Today is Friday, May 23, the 143rd day of 2003 with 222 to follow.
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The Almanac

Today is Thursday, May 23, the 143rd day of 2002 with 222 to follow.
By United Press International

Artifacts explore American presidency

CHICAGO, Feb. 17 (UPI) -- President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's poker chips are across the room from the CBS microphone he used for his famous "fireside chat" radio addresses in 1935 dur
AL SWANSON
Wiki

Ambrose Everett Burnside (May 23, 1824 – September 13, 1881) was an American soldier, railroad executive, inventor, industrialist, and politician from Rhode Island, serving as governor and a U.S. Senator. As a Union Army general in the American Civil War, he conducted successful campaigns in North Carolina and East Tennessee but was defeated in the disastrous Battle of Fredericksburg and Battle of the Crater. His distinctive style of facial hair is now known as sideburns, derived from his last name.

Burnside was born in Liberty, Indiana, the fourth of nine children of Edghill and Pamela (or Pamilia) Brown Burnside, a family of Scottish origin. His great-great-grandfather Robert Burnside (1725–1775) was born in Scotland and settled in the Province of South Carolina. His father, a native of South Carolina, was a slave owner who freed his slaves when he relocated to Indiana. Ambrose attended Liberty Seminary as a young boy, but his education was interrupted when his mother died in 1841; he was apprenticed to a local tailor, eventually becoming a partner in the business. His interest in military affairs and his father's political connections obtained an appointment to the United States Military Academy in 1843. He graduated in 1847, ranking 18th in a class of 38, and was commissioned a brevet second lieutenant in the 2nd U.S. Artillery. He traveled to Veracruz for the Mexican-American War but arrived after hostilities ceased and performed mostly garrison duty around Mexico City.

At the close of the war, Lt. Burnside served two years on the western frontier, serving under Captain Braxton Bragg in the 3rd U.S. Artillery, a light artillery unit that had been converted to cavalry duty, protecting the Western mail routes through Nevada to California. In 1849, he was wounded by an arrow in his neck during a skirmish against Apaches in Las Vegas, New Mexico. In 1852, he was assigned to Fort Adams, Newport, Rhode Island, and, while there, he married Mary Richmond Bishop of Providence, Rhode Island, on April 27. The marriage, which lasted until Burnside's death, was childless.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Ambrose Burnside."
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