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Denver Broncos owner Pat Bowlen steps down because of Alzheimer's disease

Denver Broncos owner Pat Bowlen steps down because of Alzheimer's disease

DENVER, July 23 (UPI) --Seventy-year-old Denver Broncos owner Pat Bowlen has relinquished control of the team so that he can focus on dealing with Alzheimer's disease.
Evan Bleier
Alzheimer's blood test not far away

Alzheimer's blood test not far away

LONDON, July 8 (UPI) --Researchers in Britain have identified ten proteins in the blood that predict dementia, or Alzheimer's, with 87 percent accuracy.
Brooks Hays
Nicole Brown Simpson's father dies

Nicole Brown Simpson's father dies

DANA POINT, Calif., July 5 (UPI) --Louis Brown Jr., the father of slain Nicole Brown Simpson, died at age 90.
Danielle Haynes
Bobby Womack dies at 70

Bobby Womack dies at 70

NEW YORK, June 28 (UPI) --Legendary soul singer Bobby Womack dies at age 70.
Danielle Haynes
Lawyer and Tea Party official charged in Thad Cochran photo case dies in apparent suicide

Lawyer and Tea Party official charged in Thad Cochran photo case dies in apparent suicide

JACKSON, Miss., June 27 (UPI) --Mark Mayfield, the vice chairman of the Mississippi Tea Party, died in an apparent suicide a month after he was charged with conspiracy.
Frances Burns
Depression, lack of education, physical inactivity, hypertension increase memory problems

Depression, lack of education, physical inactivity, hypertension increase memory problems

LOS ANGELES, June 5 (UPI) --Depression, lack of education, physical inactivity and high blood pressure all increase the likelihood of memory complaints in adults ages 18 to 99.
Alex Cukan

'Little Rascals' actress Jackie Lynn Taylor Fries dead at 88

SACRAMENTO, May 8 (UPI) --Actress, broadcast journalist and church minister Jackie Lynn Taylor Fries has died after a battle with Alzheimer's disease, said her husband, Jack. She was 88.
Karen Butler
Country star Glen Campbell reportedly moved to care facility

Country star Glen Campbell reportedly moved to care facility

LOS ANGELES, April 17 (UPI) -- The "Rhinestone Cowboy" singer is battling Alzheimer's disease.
Kate Stanton
Women more likely to get Alzheimer's disease than men

Women more likely to get Alzheimer's disease than men

CHICAGO, March 19 (UPI) -- U.S. women in their 60s are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer's disease as they are breast cancer, researchers say.
Blood test may detect Alzheimer's in healthy people

Blood test may detect Alzheimer's in healthy people

WASHINGTON, March 10 (UPI) -- U.S. researchers say they discovered and validated a blood test that can predict with 90 percent accuracy if a healthy person will develop Alzheimer's.
Alzheimer's cause of five to six times more deaths than reported

Alzheimer's cause of five to six times more deaths than reported

CHICAGO, March 6 (UPI) -- Alzheimer's disease may be an underlying cause of five to six times as many deaths among the elderly as currently reported, U.S. researchers suggest.

Woman, 81, held without bail for feeding bears, birds

SEBRING, Fla., March 5 (UPI) -- An 81-year-old Florida woman on probation for feeding bears is being held without bond for allegedly violating her probation by feeding crows.
Seth Rogen speaks on Capitol Hill about Alzheimer's

Seth Rogen speaks on Capitol Hill about Alzheimer's

NEW YORK, Feb. 28 (UPI) -- Actor, writer and director Seth Rogen says he "jumped" at the chance to speak on Capitol Hill about the impact Alzheimer's disease has had on his family.
Meat and the way it is prepared linked to Alzheimer's

Meat and the way it is prepared linked to Alzheimer's

NEW YORK, Feb. 25 (UPI) -- Advanced glycation endproducts, or AGEs, common in the "Western diet," suppress levels of sirtuin, a key defense" against Alzheimer's, U.S. researchers say.
Patients who report memory impairment more likely to later be diagnosed with Alzheimer's

Patients who report memory impairment more likely to later be diagnosed with Alzheimer's

LEXINGTON, Ky., Feb. 21 (UPI) -- Researchers find that if you think you are developing Alzheimer's, you may be right -- which could lead to earlier treatment.
Brooks Hays
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Photos
Alzheimer's Disease
Rudolph Tanzi, Ph.D., testifies about Alzheimer's disease before the Senate Special Committee on Aging on Capitol Hill in Washington on May 14, 2008. Tanzi is director of Generics and Aging Research Unit, Mass. General Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases and professor of neurology at Harvard University. (UPI Photo/Roger L. Wollenberg)
Wiki

Alzheimer's disease (AD), also called Alzheimer disease, Senile Dementia of the Alzheimer Type (SDAT) or simply Alzheimer's, is the most common form of dementia. This incurable, degenerative, and terminal disease was first described by German psychiatrist and neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer in 1906 and was named after him. Generally it is diagnosed in people over 65 years of age, although the less-prevalent early-onset Alzheimer's can occur much earlier. An estimated 26.6 million people worldwide had Alzheimer's in 2006; this number may quadruple by 2050.

Although each sufferer experiences Alzheimer's in a unique way, there are many common symptoms. The earliest observable symptoms are often mistakenly thought to be 'age-related' concerns, or manifestations of stress. In the early stages, the most commonly recognised symptom is memory loss, such as difficulty in remembering recently learned facts. When a doctor or physician has been notified, and AD is suspected, the diagnosis is usually confirmed with behavioural assessments and cognitive tests, often followed by a brain scan if available. As the disease advances, symptoms include confusion, irritability and aggression, mood swings, language breakdown, long-term memory loss, and the general withdrawal of the sufferer as their senses decline. Gradually, bodily functions are lost, ultimately leading to death. Individual prognosis is difficult to assess, as the duration of the disease varies. AD develops for an indeterminate period of time before becoming fully apparent, and it can progress undiagnosed for years. The mean life expectancy following diagnosis is approximately seven years. Fewer than three percent of individuals live more than fourteen years after diagnosis.

The cause and progression of Alzheimer's disease are not well understood. Research indicates that the disease is associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. Currently used treatments offer a small symptomatic benefit; no treatments to delay or halt the progression of the disease are as yet available. As of 2008, more than 500 clinical trials were investigating possible treatments for AD, but it is unknown if any of them will prove successful. Many measures have been suggested for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease, but their value is unproven in slowing the course and reducing the severity of the disease. Mental stimulation, exercise, and a balanced diet are often recommended, as both a possible prevention and a sensible way of managing the disease.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Alzheimer's Disease."
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