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Pro Football Hall of Fame Members

The annual selections to the Pro Football Hall of Fame:
By United Press International

Denver 23, Oakland 17

DENVER, Dec. 30 (UPI) -- Brian Griese returned after missing one game with a concussion and hit Rod Smith with the go-ahead, 12-yard touchdown pass with 10:59 left in the fourth quarter

In Sports from United Press International

Victory parade set for Wednesday
By United Press International

In Sports from United Press International

Nebraska, Miami 1-2 in BCS Ratings
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Al Davis
The late Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis watches his team warm up prior to the AFC Championship Game in Oakland, January 19, 2003. Davis passed away at the age of 82 on Oct. 8, 2011. ts/Terry Schmitt UPI
Wiki

Allen "Al" Davis (born July 4, 1929, in Brockton, Massachusetts) is an American football executive, who currently serves as the principal owner (titled as "president of the general partner" or "managing general partner," depending on the source) of the NFL's Oakland Raiders.

Born to a wealthy family in Brockton, Massachusetts, Davis spent his youth in the Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn and attended Erasmus Hall High School. He attended Wittenberg University and Syracuse University, where he earned a degree in English. Upon graduation, he began his coaching career as the line coach at Adelphi College from 1950 to 1951. From there Davis served as the head coach of the U.S. Army team at Ft. Belvoir, Virginia from 1952 to 1953. His next coaching assignment was as the line coach and chief recruiter for The Citadel. From 1957 to 1959 Davis was an offensive line coach at the University of Southern California.

Davis' first coaching experience in professional football came as the offensive end coach of the Los Angeles/San Diego Chargers from 1960 to 1962.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Al Davis."
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