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The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Monday, Jan. 7, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Saturday, Jan. 7, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Monday, Jan. 7, 2008
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Sunday, Jan. 7, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday Jan. 7, the seventh day of 2006, with 358 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Friday, Jan. 7, the seventh day of 2005, with 358 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Jan. 7, the seventh day of 2004, with 359 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, Jan. 7, the seventh day of 2003, with 358 to follow.
By United Press International

Scott's World -- UPI Arts & Entertainment

HOLLYWOOD, June 4 (UPI) -- Kingmaker Lew Wasserman, who died at 89 this week, did not signify the end of an era in Hollywood; he introduced a new and unfortunate epoch in Tinseltown.
VERNON SCOTT, United Press International

Alan King brings Sam Goldwyn to the stage

NEW YORK, March 26 (UPI) -- Alan King is back on the New York stage in a role that fits him like a glove -- that of Hollywood movie mogul Sam Goldwyn, who began his career as a glove sales
FREDERICK M. WINSHIP

Scott's World -- UPI Arts & Entertainment

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 14 (UPI) -- Encouraged by the 2001 highest box-office grosses in history, the major studios have scheduled a healthy number of new films for 2002.
VERNON SCOTT, United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Monday, Jan. 7, the seventh day of 2002, with 358 to follow.
By United Press International
Wiki

Adolph Zukor, born Adolph Cukor, (January 7, 1873 – June 10, 1976) was a film mogul and founder of Paramount Pictures.

He was born to a Jewish family in Ricse, Hungary, which was then a part of the Austro-Hungarian empire. In 1889, at the age of 16, he emigrated to America. Like most immigrants, he began modestly. When he first landed in New York, he stayed with his family and worked in an upholstery shop. A friend got him a job as an apprentice at a furrier. Zukor stayed there for two years. When he left to become a "contract" worker, sewing fur pieces and selling them himself, he was nineteen years old and an accomplished designer. But he was young and adventuresome, and the 1892 Columbian Exposition in Chicago, commemorating Columbus's discovery of America, drew him to the Midwest. Once there, he started a fur business. In the second season of operation, Zukor's Novelty Fur Company expanded to twenty-five men and opened a branch.

One of the stubborn fallacies of movie history is that the men who created the film industry were all impoverished young vulgarians. Zukor clearly didn't fit this profile. By 1903, he already looked and lived like a wealthy young burgher, and he certainly earned the income of one. He had a commodious apartment at 111th Street and Seventh Avenue in New York City's wealthy German-Jewish section.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Adolph Zukor."
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