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The Almanac

Today is Monday, Feb. 17, the 48th day of 2003 with 317 to follow.
By United Press International

A Blast from the Past

Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr had tied in the Electoral College, so on this date in 1801, the House of Representatives had to choose between the two and, after 35 indecisive ballots, picked Jefferson as the third president of the United States. Burr bec
By United Press International

A Blast from the Past

The weekly UPI package of A Blast from the Past for Feb. 17-23.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, Feb. 6, the 37th day of 2003 with 328 to follow.
By United Press International

A Blast from the Past

World War II began on this date in 1939 when Germany invaded Poland. In response, Great Britain and France served an ultimatum on Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, but it was ignored. The United States would remain out the fray until Dec. 7, 1941, when the Japane
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Sept. 1, the 244th day of 2002 with 121 to follow.
By United Press International

A Blast from the Past

The weekly package of A Blast from the Past for Aug. 26-Sept. 1.
By United Press International

A Blast from the Past

Today is July 11.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, July 11, the 192nd day of 2002 with 173 to follow.
By United Press International

Today in Music: a look back at pop music

Today is July 8.
By United Press International

A Blast from the Past

Today is July 8.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Feb. 17, the 48th day of 2002 with 317 to follow. The moon is waxing, moving toward its first quarter.
By United Press International

A Blast From The Past

Today is Feb. 17. Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr had tied in the Electoral College, so on this date in 1801, the House of Representatives voted and choose Jefferson as the third president of the United States.
PENNY NELSON BARTHOLOMEW, United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Feb. 6, the 37th day of 2002 with 328 to follow. The moon is waning, moving toward its new phase.
By United Press International

A Blast From The Past

Today is Feb. 11. A young French girl, Bernadette Sourbirous, claimed on this date in 1858 that the Virgin Mary had appeared to her at Lourdes.
PENNY NELSON BARTHOLOMEW, United Press International
Page 4 of 5
Photos
Aaron Burr
NYP2001081325 - 13 AUGUST 2001 - NEW YORK, NEW YORK, USA: The sitting room of Alexander Hamilton's home, now part of the Hamilton Grange National Memorial, is located in upper Manhattan, New York City as seen on August 10, 2001. The Federal-style country house, which was Hamilton's home up until he died in a duel with Aaron Burr in 1804, will be moved to a new location near by. mg/Monika Graff UPI
Wiki

Aaron Burr, Jr. (February 6, 1756 – September 14, 1836) was an important political figure in the early history of the United States of America. After serving as a Continental Army officer in the Revolutionary War, Burr became a successful lawyer and politician. He was elected twice to the New York State Assembly (1784–1785, 1798–1799), was appointed New York State Attorney General (1789–1791), was chosen as a United States Senator (1791–1797) from the state of New York, and reached the apex of his career as third Vice President of the United States (1801–1805), under President Thomas Jefferson. Despite these accomplishments, Burr is chiefly remembered as the man who killed his rival Alexander Hamilton in the famous 1804 duel. Controversy dogged Burr throughout his lifetime, and his reputation among historians remains contested.

Burr was born in Newark, New Jersey, to the Reverend Aaron Burr, Sr., a Presbyterian minister and second president of the College of New Jersey in Newark (which moved in 1756 to Princeton and later became Princeton University). His mother, Esther Edwards, was the daughter of Jonathan Edwards, the famous Calvinist theologian, making Burr Edwards's grandson. The Burrs also had a daughter, Sarah, who married Tapping Reeve, founder of the Litchfield Law School in Litchfield, Connecticut.

Aaron Burr's father died in 1757, and his mother the following year, leaving him an orphan at the age of two. Grandfather Edwards and his wife Sarah also died that year; young Aaron and his sister Sally went to live with the William Shippen family in Philadelphia. In 1759, the children's guardianship was assumed by twenty-one-year-old uncle Timothy Edwards. The next year, Edwards married Rhoda Ogden and moved to Elizabeth, New Jersey. Rhoda's younger brothers Aaron and Matthias became the boy's playmates and lifelong friends.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Aaron Burr."
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