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The Almanac

Today is Monday, July 11, the 192nd day of 2005 with 173 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, Feb. 19, the 50th day of 2005 with 315 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, Feb. 17, the 48th day of 2005 with 317 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Feb. 6, the 37th day of 2005 with 328 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Sept. 1, the 245th day of 2004 with 121 to follow.
By United Press International

Descendents of duelers re-enact event

NEW JERSEY, N.J., July 11 (UPI) -- Descendants of U.S. political rivals drew pistols at 10 paces in New Jersey Sunday, in a re-enactment of a 200-year-old duel.

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, July 11, the 193rd day of 2004 with 173 to follow.
By United Press International

Group wants to put Reagan on $10 bill

WASHINGTON, June 8 (UPI) -- Fans of President Ronald Reagan want his image to replace Alexander Hamilton's on the U.S. $10 bill, USA Today reported Tuesday.

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, Feb. 19, the 50th day of 2004 with 316 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, Feb. 17, the 48th day of 2004 with 318 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Friday, Feb. 6, the 37th day of 2004 with 329 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Monday, Sept. 1, the 244th day of 2003 with 121 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Friday, July 11, the 192nd day of 2003 with 173 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Feb. 19, the 50th day of 2003 with 315 to follow.
By United Press International

A Blast from the Past

On this date in 1942, 10 weeks after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt authorized the removal of any or all people from military areas "as deemed necessary or desirable." The military in turn defined the entire West Coast, home to the
By United Press International
Page 3 of 5
Photos
Aaron Burr
NYP2001081325 - 13 AUGUST 2001 - NEW YORK, NEW YORK, USA: The sitting room of Alexander Hamilton's home, now part of the Hamilton Grange National Memorial, is located in upper Manhattan, New York City as seen on August 10, 2001. The Federal-style country house, which was Hamilton's home up until he died in a duel with Aaron Burr in 1804, will be moved to a new location near by. mg/Monika Graff UPI
Wiki

Aaron Burr, Jr. (February 6, 1756 – September 14, 1836) was an important political figure in the early history of the United States of America. After serving as a Continental Army officer in the Revolutionary War, Burr became a successful lawyer and politician. He was elected twice to the New York State Assembly (1784–1785, 1798–1799), was appointed New York State Attorney General (1789–1791), was chosen as a United States Senator (1791–1797) from the state of New York, and reached the apex of his career as third Vice President of the United States (1801–1805), under President Thomas Jefferson. Despite these accomplishments, Burr is chiefly remembered as the man who killed his rival Alexander Hamilton in the famous 1804 duel. Controversy dogged Burr throughout his lifetime, and his reputation among historians remains contested.

Burr was born in Newark, New Jersey, to the Reverend Aaron Burr, Sr., a Presbyterian minister and second president of the College of New Jersey in Newark (which moved in 1756 to Princeton and later became Princeton University). His mother, Esther Edwards, was the daughter of Jonathan Edwards, the famous Calvinist theologian, making Burr Edwards's grandson. The Burrs also had a daughter, Sarah, who married Tapping Reeve, founder of the Litchfield Law School in Litchfield, Connecticut.

Aaron Burr's father died in 1757, and his mother the following year, leaving him an orphan at the age of two. Grandfather Edwards and his wife Sarah also died that year; young Aaron and his sister Sally went to live with the William Shippen family in Philadelphia. In 1759, the children's guardianship was assumed by twenty-one-year-old uncle Timothy Edwards. The next year, Edwards married Rhoda Ogden and moved to Elizabeth, New Jersey. Rhoda's younger brothers Aaron and Matthias became the boy's playmates and lifelong friends.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Aaron Burr."
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