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Britney Spears music used to scare off Somali pirates

British naval officers reportedly use songs from Britney Spears' oeuvre to ward off Somali pirates.
Posted By Kate Stanton   |   Oct. 29, 2013 at 6:00 PM   |   Comments

(UPI) --Don't forget to bring your copy of "Oops!...I Did It Again" next time you hit the high seas, because according to British naval officers, Britney Spears might be your best defense against pirates.

Merchant navy officer Rachel Owens had admitted that security teams arm themselves with the pop star's music to scare off Western music-hating Somali pirates.

"Her songs were chosen by the security team because they thought the pirates would hate them most," she told Metro on Sunday.

"These guys can’t stand Western culture or music, making Britney’s hits perfect," she added.

But according to Steven Jones, of the Security Association for the Maritime Industry, there's one pop star he wouldn't even use on his worst enemy.

"Pirates will go to any lengths to avoid or try to overcome the music," Jones said. "I’d imagine using Justin Bieber would be against the Geneva Convention."

The Atlantic Wire points out a different side to the story, pointing out that the barrage of sound is what deters pirates. Spears' music just might be slightly more annoying to them. "Long Range Acoustic Device (LRAD) defense systems have been in use for a while."

Long Range Acoustic Device (LRAD) defense systems have been in use for a while. LRADs blast walls of sound which bring people to their knees, and have been used to quell riots and deter pirates in the past.

According to the Daily Beast, military and intelligence officials often use music to drive enemies to the breaking point.

Bruce Springsteen's "Born in the U.S.A." and Barney's "I Love You" have been used by interrogators at Guantanamo Bay. Even local officials in Christchurch, New Zealand used to blare Barry Manilow's easy listening hits over the mall loudspeakers to drive away loitering punks.

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