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Astronaut records song in Space with Barenaked Ladies singer

Posted By GABRIELLE LEVY, UPI.com   |   Feb. 9, 2013 at 9:53 AM   |   Comments

Feb. 9 (UPI) -- Col. Chris Hadfield has been the commander of the International Space Station for less than two months, but he's quickly become a sensation for his online presence and his overall cool factor.

He regularly tweets gorgeous photos of the Earth from above, engages with fans on Reddit and even had a chat with another famed (fake) commander, actor William Shatner, setting aflutter the hearts of space geeks and Trekkies alike.

Hadfield is also a pretty talented musician, and he's working on recording an album from space. He recorded the holiday song "Jewel in the Night."

But he stepped it up this week, writing and recording a collaboration--a space jam, if you will--with the singer of Barenaked Ladies Ed Robertson.

The astronaut and the singer say they "communicate all the time," bouncing song ideas off one another, sending demos back and forth and just chatting.

Hadfield recorded his parts ahead of time, working off a demo from Robertson, and sent it down Earth for mixing. Then, Robertson, backed with a choir, performed along with Hadfield's video live.

The song, called "I.S.S. (Is Somebody Singing)" premiered Friday.

In this video, Hadfield chats about the process of recording "I.S.S." from space and Earth.

Follow @gabbilevy and @UPI on Twitter.
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