account
search
search

Georgia: Gas project will strengthen hand

Tbilisi sees geopolitical benefits from Azeri pipeline for Europe.
By Daniel J. Graeber Follow @dan_graeber Contact the Author   |   Nov. 24, 2014 at 6:51 AM
http://cdnph.upi.com/sv/em/upi_com/UPI-2391416828939/2014/1/385298850a9a215c2a80c36c3756f0bd/Georgia-Gas-project-will-strengthen-hand.jpg
Former Soviet republic Georgia sees strength in Azeri gas pipeline for Europe. (UPI/Shutterstock/tcly)
POTI, Georgia, Nov. 24 (UPI) -- A natural gas pipeline from the Caspian Sea to the European market will enhance the geopolitical strength of the region, Georgia's prime minister said.

Georgian Prime Minister Irakli Garibashvili was on hand for the opening of a transport terminal for the pipeline at the port city of Poti.

"The terminal as part of the Shah Deniz II project will transport the pipes and other equipment required for the expansion of the South Caucasus Pipeline through Azerbaijan and Georgia," he said in an interview published Sunday by the region's Trend news service.

Shah Deniz will deliver about 560 billion cubic feet of natural gas per year, with sales scheduled for Georgia and Turkey in 2018 and the rest to Europe the following year.

Europe views Shah Deniz as a means to diversify a natural gas market dependent on Russia. For Georgia, a former Soviet republic, it's part of a broader shift away from the Kremlin.

"This is one of the most difficult and complex energy projects, which will strengthen the geopolitical positions of Azerbaijan and Georgia," the prime minister said.

Georgian President Giorgi Margvelashvili vowed to move his country closer to the European Union and to repair ties with Russia, which were damaged when the two sides fought over the breakaway republics of Abkhazia and South Ossetia in 2008.

BP, which leads the project's development, has awarded more than $1 billion in development contracts since selecting the Trans-Adriatic pipeline as its option for Shah Deniz last year.

Azerbaijan, Georgia and Turkey play host to one of Europe's more important oil pipelines.

Topics: Shah Deniz
© 2014 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.

London: Climate change a "great risk"

Most in the international community want action now, British survey finds.
By Daniel J. Graeber Follow @dan_graeber Contact the Author   |   Nov. 24, 2014 at 6:22 AM
http://cdnph.upi.com/sv/em/upi_com/UPI-7851416826856/2014/1/ce6b8c767095fdfd871543e690f98498/London-Climate-change-a-great-risk.jpg
"The science is clear" about climate change, British minister says. (UPI/Shutterstock/ ChinellatoPhoto)
LONDON, Nov. 24 (UPI) -- The international community is at a turning point in terms of sentiments in favor of addressing climate change now, the British energy secretary said Monday.

"The science is clear," Energy and Climate Change Secretary Ed Davey said in a statement. "Climate change poses great risks to health, global food security and economic development – and unchecked will change every part of our lives."

This year's report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change found emissions of carbon dioxide, a potent greenhouse gas, from the combustion of fossil fuels accounted for 78 percent of the total emissions increase from 1970 to 2010.

A British government report said there was an increasing body of evidence to suggest changes in global weather patterns are "consistent with what is expected from the fundamental physics of a warming world."

Winter storms in December and January led to the wettest period in the country since record-keeping began.

Davey pointed to a survey from polling firm Populus that found more than half of the global public want their leaders to take action to address climate issues.

"We are at a global turning point," he said.

From across the Atlantic, President Barack Obama has said "nobody gets a pass" on joining the fight against climate change. He and Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, issued a joint declaration on the shared need to address climate issues during a mid-November meeting in Beijing.

Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., expected to lead the Environment and Public Works Committee in the upcoming U.S. Congress, the president's climate stance is "handcuffing" the economy.

© 2014 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
Load More
x
Feedback