facebook
twitter
search
search

Charlotte police's audio of shooting confirms officers thought man had gun

By Allen Cone   |   Sept. 30, 2016 at 1:19 PM

CHARLOTTE, N.C., Sept. 30 (UPI) -- Police radio recordings from just before the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott appear to back up the accounts of Charlotte police that they were after a man with a gun.

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department released some police radio recordings on Thursday in response to a public records request by The Charlotte Observer.

On Saturday, Police Chief Kerr Putney released video from a dashboard camera and a body cam worn by a uniformed officer outside Keith Lamont Scott's apartment complex on Sept. 20.

That transmission confirms earlier information that officers had seen Scott with a gun and marijuana when they were at the complex trying to serve a warrant on another man.

According to the tapes, an officer is heard communicating with an officer nearby.

"Roll back to this apartment behind you. There was a guy parked next to us rolling a joint and had a gun."

Then, he gave a more precise location.

"We're back here at the other visitor parking," he said.

Officers then put on vests and returned to confront Scott, who was sitting in his SUV.

An officer notified his dispatcher 37 seconds after four shots were fired at Scott.

"We got shots fired," he radioed. "One suspect down. Lexington Court."

The dispatcher then asked whether any officers were hurt.

"All officers are 10-4," was the reply. "We got one suspect down. We need Medic."

Police also released a 911 call from a man advising police that a medic would be needed.

The State Bureau of Investigation, which is conducting the primary investigation into the case, was consulted before the tapes were released, the city police said.

Police said some information was redacted and voices altered in accordance with state law.

Topics: Marijuana
© 2016 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.

South Korea to spend nearly $400MM in anti-sub capabilities

By Elizabeth Shim Contact the Author   |   Sept. 30, 2016 at 1:16 PM

SEOUL, Sept. 30 (UPI) -- South Korea's military plans to invest more than $390 million in sonar technology for destroyers in order to deter North Korean submarines.

The funds are being allocated for 2018-27, with the goal of upgrading Seoul's detection capabilities, Yonhap news agency reported Friday.

North Korea has increased the number of tests involving submarine-launched ballistic missiles, or SLBMs, in 2016.

Seoul in response has been budgeting more funds toward developing submarine tracking and detection.

South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration said Friday the agency has passed proposals to improve on two types of sonars designed to capture submarine movements through acoustic tracking systems: the hull-mounted sonar, and a towed array, which is a system of hydrophones towed behind a ship on a cable.

"When the project is completed capabilities for detection and tracking will be significantly improved, and it will enhance response capabilities directed at enemy submarines," DAPA said in its statement.

North Korea is developing submersible craft at various locations.

Writing for 38 North, a Johns Hopkins University website dedicated to North Korea issues, analyst Joseph Bermudez stated Friday that activity could be seen at Sinpo South Shipyard in recent commercial satellite imagery.

According to Bermudez, images show a "10-meter-in-diameter circular component outside the facility's recently renovated fabrication hall," which could be a "component for the pressure hull of a new submarine."

If the object is for the construction of a new sub, it would be larger than Pyongyang's GORAE-class experimental ballistic missile submarine, the analyst writes.

© 2016 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
Load More