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U.K. holds minute of silence in 10th anniversary of 7/7 attacks

By Andrew V. Pestano Follow @AVPLive9 Contact the Author   |   July 7, 2015 at 10:12 AM
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LONDON, July 7 (UPI) -- A minute of silence was observed throughout the United Kingdom Tuesday in remembrance of the 52 people killed by suicide bombers in the 7/7 London attacks.

On July 7, 2005, four suicide bombers detonated separately on three Tube underground subway stations and a double-decker bus, killing 52 people and injuring more than 700. The attacks are known simply as 7/7.

Several Tube stations held a minute's silence at 8:50 a.m. local time, when the bombings first began a decade ago.

Al-Qaida in Pakistan and Afghanistan accomplices Mohammad Sidique Khan, 30, Shehzad Tanweer, 22, Hasib Hussain, 18, and Germaine Lindsay, 19, carried out the attack -- considered the "worst single terrorist atrocity on British soil."

Bishop of London Richard Chartres delivered an address at St Paul's Cathedral.

"Soon after 7/7 the families and friends of the victims compiled a book of tributes. It is a taste of the ocean of pain surrounding the loss of each one of the victims," Chartres said. "The tribute book is also very revealing about the character of the London which the bombers attacked. The majority of the victims were young. They came from all over the U.K. and all over the world."

Wreaths were laid by survivors and several officials, including Prime Minister David Cameron and London Mayor Boris Johnson, at the July 7 Memorial in Hyde Park. Flowers will be laid at the site of the attacks.

"Ten years on from the 7/7 London attacks, the threat continues to be as real as it is deadly -- but we will never be cowed by terrorism," Cameron said in a statement.

© 2015 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.

Oil struggles to correct after Monday's drop

Brent crude oil prices recover 1 percent, but still below the $60 mark.
By Daniel J. Graeber Follow @dan_graeber Contact the Author   |   July 7, 2015 at 9:54 AM
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NEW YORK, July 7 (UPI) -- Crude oil prices were mixed in early Tuesday trading, with some corrections emerging after a major sell off greeted triple international market threats.

Major crude oil indices lost more than 5 percent of their value during Monday's session amid concerns about the long-term health of the Chinese economy, ongoing debt issues in Greece and the status of nuclear negotiations with Iran.

West Texas Intermediate, the U.S. benchmark, was relatively flat in early Tuesday trading at $52.49 per barrel. Brent crude oil sold for $57.01 per barrel, recovering 1 percent from Monday's steep decline.

Crude oil prices are struggling to hold above $60 per barrel. Prices dropped far below the $100 barrel mark starting in June 2014 as supply far outweighed demand. Signs of a modest global recovery in early 2015 were weighed down in the latter half of the year amid widespread geopolitical concerns.

The British Foreign and Commonwealth Office issued a travel advisory Monday that warned of financial risks in Greece after voters decided overwhelmingly against an international bailout deal. The Greek economy cast a shadow over the last global financial crisis. The European Central Bank said it was mindful of the fiscal threats, deciding to maintain its level of emergency liquidity assistance to Greek banks.

Talks in Vienna, meanwhile, are continuing for the second time beyond deadline to formalize a deal that would ease sanctions pressure on Iran in exchange for firm commitments to pull back from the nuclear brink. Another potential deadline is set to expire later this week.

Members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries vowed to maintain their production levels despite the glut of oil on the market. A survey from Platts finds OPEC production increased in June for the fourth straight month and more oil could find its way to the global marketplace if an Iranian nuclear deal is brokered in Vienna.

© 2015 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
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