U.S. airstrikes target Islamic State militants surrounding Mosul Dam

U.S. military forces launched airstrikes overnight against Islamic State militant positions in and around the IS-seized Mosul Dam, Iraq's largest dam and electrical supplier to the IS-controlled city of Mosul, the second largest city in Iraq.
By JC Finley Follow @JC_Finley Contact the Author   |   Aug. 16, 2014 at 9:56 AM
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BAGHDAD, Aug. 16 (UPI) -- U.S. fighter jets launched airstrikes early Saturday against Islamic State militants in and around the northern Iraqi city of Mosul.

Kurdish media reported that American jets targeted IS position near Iraq's largest dam -- the Mosul Dam -- which was seized by IS on August 7, striking in Rabia Crossing, Mahmoudia, Telskouf, Zumar and Tilkef.

According to Rudaw, once the bombings cease, "Kurdish Peshmerga forces are expected to launch a ground assault to retake areas lost to the IS earlier this month including the Yezidi town of Shingal."

The Mosul dam is located on the Tigris River 30 miles northwest of Mosul, Iraq's second largest city, which has been under IS control since its capture on June 10.

The U.S. and Kurdish Peshmerga are coordinating military efforts to repel the IS push toward Kurdish territory and the Kurdish capital of Erbil, where the U.S. has a consulate.

On Friday, U.S. Central Command reported that it launched airstrikes against two IS vehicles.

"After receiving reports from Kurdish forces that ISIL terrorists were attacking civilians in the village of Kawju, located south of the village of Sinjar," CENTCOM said that "U.S. aircraft identified and followed an ISIL armed vehicle to a roadside area south of Sinjar. At approximately 10:10 a.m. EDT, U.S. aircraft struck and destroyed two vehicles in the area."

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