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Putin's New Year message to Obama: Strive for constructive cooperation

Dec. 31, 2013 at 10:36 AM   |   Comments

MOSCOW, Dec. 31 (UPI) -- Russian President Vladimir Putin told U.S. President Obama Russia intends to maintain cooperation with the United States to work toward global stability.

In a holiday message to Obama released Tuesday, Putin said the two countries' joint efforts can make tangible contributions to maintaining constancy throughout the world, ITAR-Tass reported.

"The Russian president noted the events of the outgoing year showed graphically that Russia and the United States, acting in the spirit of partnership with respect for mutual interests, can make real contributions in maintaining global stability and tackling the most pressing international problems," the Kremlin said of Putin's message.

Putin said he wanted to maintain a "constructive dialogue" and work jointly with the United States "to build up trust and mutual understanding in Russia-U.S. relations and broader cooperation in economic, scientific-technical, cultural and other spheres."

Topics: Barack Obama
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