Poll: Donald Trump's job approval rating declines to 38 percent

By Andrew V. Pestano Follow @AVPLive9 Contact the Author   |   Updated Feb. 23, 2017 at 8:20 AM
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Feb. 23 (UPI) -- A Quinnipiac University poll shows that President Donald Trump's job approval rating has decreased to 38 percent, down 4 percent since he was inaugurated.

In the poll of U.S. voters released Wednesday, Trump has a disapproval rating of 55 percent. He has a 36 percent approval rating among women and a 41 percent approval rating among men.

When split by party affiliation, Trump has an 83 percent approval rating among Republicans, a 5 percent approval rating among Democrats and a 38 percent approval rating among independent voters.

Trump has a 39 percent to 55 percent favorability rating, which Quinnipiac said was his worst net score since taking office. Vice President Mike Pence has a nearly split favorability rating of 41 percent to 40 percent.

On Trump's personal qualities, 55 percent of voters said he is not honest, 55 percent said he does not have good leadership skills, 53 percent said he does not care about average Americans, 63 percent said he is not level-headed and 60 percent said he does not share their values.

Sixty-four percent of voters said he is a strong person and 58 percent said he is intelligent, the poll said.

"President Donald Trump's popularity is sinking like a rock," Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll, said in a statement. "He gets slammed on honesty, empathy, level headedness and the ability to unite. And two of his strong points, leadership and intelligence, are sinking to new lows. This is a terrible survey one month in."

Sixty-one percent of voters said they can trust Trump to do what is right "some of the time" or "hardly ever," while 38 percent said they can Trust trump to do what is right "almost all of the time" or "most of the time."

When compared to U.S. courts, 58 percent of voters trust the judicial branch of government to do what is right "almost all of the time" or "most of the time," while 40 percent think they can trust the courts to do what is right "some of the time" or "hardly ever."

On the topic of the U.S. courts blocking Trump's executive order on immigration, 59 percent of voters said they approve of the block.

Voters oppose Trump's actions suspending immigration from "terror prone" regions 49 percent to 43 percent; suspending for 90 days all travel to the U.S. by citizens from seven mostly Muslim nations by 53 percent to 45 percent; suspending for 120 days immigration of all refugees to the U.S. from any nation 60 percent to 37 percent; and suspending indefinitely all immigration to the U.S. of Syrian refugees by 68 percent to 27 percent.

On Trump's contentious relationship with the media -- in which he called several outlets "the enemy of the American people" -- 90 percent of voters said it is "very important" or "somewhat important" "that the news media hold public officials accountable."

About 50 percent of voters disapprove of the way the news media has covered Trump, while 61 percent disapprove of the way Trump talks about the media.

The Quinnipiac University poll said voters trust the media more than Trump -- 52 percent to 37 percent -- "to tell you the truth about important issues."

"The media, so demonized by the Trump administration, is actually a good deal more popular than President Trump," Malloy added.

On other issues, 47 percent to 41 percent of voters approve of the way Trump is handling the economy, while 36 percent approve of the way he handling foreign policy, 44 percent to 49 percent approve the way he is handling terrorism, and 58 percent disapprove of his handling of immigration issues.

Trump tweeted in early February that "any negative polls are fake news."

Quinnipiac surveyed 1,323 voters nationwide with live interviewers calling via landlines and cell phones from Feb. 16-21. The poll has a 2.7 percent margin of error.

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