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Where the candidates stand in delegates after Super Tuesday

By Andrew V. Pestano Follow @AVPLive9 Contact the Author   |   March 2, 2016 at 8:07 AM
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WASHINGTON, March 2 (UPI) -- Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton were the winners on Super Tuesday, but as far as their main opponents are concerned, Ted Cruz and Bernie Sanders, respectively, the race is far from over.

Trump, winning seven states out of 11 on Tuesday, walked away from Super Tuesday with a commanding lead of 285 delegates in total. Texas Sen. Cruz came second with 161 delegates and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio is third with 87 delegates, data from Real Clear Politics indicate. Ohio Gov. John Kasich has 25 delegates and Dr. Ben Carson is in last place with eight.

Clinton, winning seven states out of 11, woke up Wednesday with 1,000 pledged delegates and presumed superdelegates in total to Sanders' 371.

For Republicans, 1,237 are needed out of an available 1,899 to win the party's nomination. The GOP will officially back its nominee during the Republican National Convention scheduled to begin July 28.

For Democrats, the delegate results are not official until the Democratic National Convention, which is scheduled to begin July 25. The formality is due to the use of superdelegates, who can support any delegate whereas pledged delegates support the winner of a state's primary. A Democrat needs a total of 2,383 delegates out of an available 3,393 to win the party's nomination.

For Republican candidates, 780 delegates are up for grabs through the rest of March. There are 682 delegates available among the Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana and Maine primaries and caucuses on March 5 and the Florida, Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina and Ohio primaries and caucuses on March 15.

Rubio's campaign may be doomed if he fails to win in Florida.

There are 98 more delegates available on the last day of GOP primaries of the month held on March 22 in Arizona and Utah.

For Democratic candidates, 1,264 delegates are up for grabs through the rest of March. There are 991 delegates available among the Kansas, Louisiana and Nebraska primaries and caucuses on March 5 and the Florida, Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina and Ohio primaries and caucuses on March 15.

There are 273 more delegates available on the last two primary and caucus days on March 22 and March 26 across six states.

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