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Dallas man ordered a $54 cup of coffee at Starbucks, sets new record

The drink had 60 shots of espresso and beat the previous record by $7.45.
By Matt Bradwell Follow @mckb26 Contact the Author   |   May 28, 2014 at 3:49 PM
| License Photo
DALLAS, May 28 (UPI) -- A loyal Starbucks customer in Dallas set a new record for the most expensive drink ever served at the coffeehouse, spending $54.75 on a 128-ounce frappuccino with 60 shots of espresso. The custom drink was a conscious attempt to beat the previously held record of $47.30 set in 2013.

The record-holding customer, known only as Andrew, didn't even have to pay for the drink -- as a Gold member of Starbucks' loyalty program, he had earned the right to one free drink for having purchased 12.

"It took a few minutes to figure out all the math, but in the end, it took about 55 shots to get us over the $50 line, and we just rounded it up to 60 to make it easy," Andrew told the Consumerist.

In addition to being expensive, Andrew wanted his order to be "drinkable."

"The $47.30 guy put in two bananas, strawberry, matcha powder, pumpkin spice, and lots of other things that probably don't go well together and definitely don't go well with 40 shots of espresso. They help raise the price, so I can't fault him for the strategy, but I didn't want to go that route."

The baristas dubbed their work the "Sexagintuple Vanilla Bean Mocha Frappuccino."

Reports are quick to point out that 60 shots of espresso would contain about a 4.5 milligrams of caffeine, far more than any human can safely consume in a single day and almost half a lethal dosage.

A spokesperson for Starbucks told Seattle Weekly they do not encourage their baristas to attempt to recreate the drink, as it is not safe for consumption. Andrew admitted to only drinking a third of it before saving the rest for later.


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