Texas second grader claims teacher confiscated Bible during reading time

The book was allegedly snatched by a teacher at Hamilton Elementary in Cypress.
By Evan Bleier Follow @itishowitis Contact the Author   |   April 23, 2014 at 8:02 AM

CYPRESS , Texas, April 23 (UPI) -- A Texas teacher may be investigated after the Liberty Institute released a statement and sent a letter to Hamilton Elementary School about an alleged incident involving a second-grade student’s choice of reading material.

The student's family claims the teacher confiscated a copy of the Bible their daughter was reading during a "read to myself" session. The teacher then informed the girl that the Bible is “inappropriate reading material” and that she should not bring it back to school again.

The anonymous family then contacted the Liberty Institute for help in the matter.

According to Michael Berry, senior counsel with the Liberty Institute, the library at Hamilton has copies of the Bible. “So if it’s appropriate for their own library, why on Earth would it not be appropriate for their own students,” Berry told KHOU.

The Cypress Fairbanks Independent School District released a statement about the incident:

"During a student's independent reading time, students are required to read a book that is "Just Right." A "Just Right" book is when the student can read most of the words, comprehend the text and that the book is appropriate for the type of text or genre that is being taught. As such religious material, including the Bible, that meets these guidelines would be permissible for a classroom assignment and/or independent reading."

“They are letting them read The Hunger Games, that’s kids killing kids, why can’t she read the Bible," said parent Jennifer Muse.

Related UPI Stories
Latest Headlines
Trending Stories
Pepsi to release 'Back to the Future Part II' inspired Pepsi Perfect
Nobel Prize in medicine awarded to parasitic disease scientists
Womb transplants begin in U.K. after Sweden's success
Gay Vatican priest comes out day before Pope Francis begins synod on family issues
Scientists find roadmap that may lead to 'exercise pill'