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Kidnapped boy sings gospel song until his abductor releases him

Kidnapped boy: “He told me he didn’t want to hear a word from me."
By JC Sevcik   |   April 23, 2014 at 4:05 PM

ATLANTA, April 23 (UPI) -- Willie Myrick, a 9-year-old boy from Atlanta, is playing in his front yard.

He notices some money on the ground, bends to pick it up.

Someone grabs him, throws him in a car, pulls away.

“He told me he didn’t want to hear a word from me,” Myrick said.

But Willie refused to be quiet.

He sang.

He sang a gospel song called “Every Praise” and he did not stop singing, not when his kidnapper told him to shut up, not when he cursed him or screamed at him.

Willie would not be silenced.

Willie sang and sang for hours, until the kidnapper finally let him go.

"He opened the door and threw me out," Willie said. "He told me not to tell anyone."

The boy ran to a nearby home for help.

Upon hearing the story, Hezekiah Walker, the Grammy Award-winning gospel singer of “Every Praise” flew from New York City to Atlanta to meet Willie.

"It's just emotional to me because you never know who you're going to touch," said Walker. “I just wanted to hug him and tell him I love him.”

According to the Detroit Free Press, Walker visited Mt. Carmel Baptist Church where he was greeted with a standing ovation. He embraced Willie in a tight hug, tears streaming, and the two led the congregation in singing “Every Praise.”

The man who Kidnapped Willie Myrick is still at large. Police don’t have any leads but have released a sketch and are asking anyone with any information to call CrimeStoppers at 404-577-TIPS.

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