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Hobby Lobby win in Supreme Court could lead to more 'religious liberty' laws

The case "Citizens v. Hobby Lobby" regards the chain discount store asking for exception in the birth control mandate on grounds of religious liberty.
By Aileen Graef   |   March 4, 2014 at 12:30 PM   |   Comments

WASHINGTON, March 4 (UPI) -- The Hobby Lobby Supreme Court case is believed to lead to more "religious liberty" laws like the Arizona law that gave businesses the right to refuse service to the LGBT community, which was considered discriminatory and was vetoed.

Under the Affordable Care Act, businesses are required to provide their employees with health insurance and under the ACA, birth control coverage is also a mandate. The Hobby Lobby has taken the case to the Supreme Court to because they believe that the mandate would force them to be "morally complicit" in the "death of an embryo." Many groups feel like this form of legislation in the name of "religious liberty" could lead to inherent discrimination.

"All of these attacks are cut from the same dangerous cloth, and they would roll back the clock on the balance our nation has struck to respect religious beliefs while protecting the rights and liberties of all," said Planned Parenthood on the case. "LGBT people could be turned away at hotels and restaurants, women could be denied access to birth control, people with HIV or AIDS could be denied health care, single mothers could be denied bank loans, and children could be prevented from getting immunizations."

However, other groups, such as the conservative think tank the Heritage Foundation, say these laws are necessary to maintain constitutionally-protected religious freedom.

"Indeed, the Arizona law would protect groups like Hobby Lobby from a state-level HHS mandate coercing them to provide insurance coverage that violated their religious convictions," said Ryan T. Anderson of the Heritage Foundation. "The crucial question here is not whether you yourself would or wouldn't pay for abortion-inducing drugs and contraception, but whether government should force the Little Sisters of the Poor to do so."

As the Hobby Lobby has made the case in the lower courts, it is believed they have a substantial chance in presenting their case to the Supreme Court.


[HuffPost Live]

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