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BART trains to roll again for morning commute

Oct. 22, 2013 at 1:56 AM

OAKLAND, Calif., Oct. 22 (UPI) -- Bay Area Rapid Transit trains will start rolling at 4 a.m. Tuesday, management said after negotiators announced a deal to end a crippling four-day strike.

The heavy-rail transit and subway system, carrying 400,000 passengers daily between San Francisco and the East Bay, will have partial service for the morning commute but should be fully up to speed by the afternoon ride home, BART General Manager Grace Crunican said.

Details of the settlement were not immediately released.

BART board of directors and members of the agency's two large unions -- Service Employees International Union Local 1021 and Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1555 -- must still approve the tentative contract agreement.

"We will go back to work and continue our efforts to keep the Bay Area moving," local ATU President Antonette Bryant said in remarks quoted by the San Jose Mercury News.

"We believe the tentative agreement will allow us to go forward with a commitment to working together," Crunican said in a statement.

"I won't go into details about the tentative agreement," she said. "I will simply say it sets BART on a path of partnerships with union members and helps us to prepare for the future."

Crunican thanked "all of you in the public for your patience through this very difficult process."

Some 2,400 train operators, station agents, mechanics, clerical workers and other employees walked off the job Friday for the second time in three months after marathon contract talks failed to produce an agreement.

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