Missing Maine toddler's mom calls for arrest following new evidence

Sept. 25, 2013 at 2:41 PM

AUGUSTA, Maine, Sept. 25 (UPI) -- The mother of a Maine toddler missing for nearly two years has called for arrests after she said investigators shared purported new blood evidence with her.

Trista Reynolds says three people in the house the night her 20-month-old daughter, Ayla Reynolds, disappeared should be charged after police photographs showed blood "everywhere," CNN reported Wednesday.

Reynolds said police shared the photos with her in January as part of their ongoing investigation. She recently revealed that information on a blog she has maintained since Ayla disappeared from the Waterville home of the child's grandmother on Dec. 17, 2011.

The first thing Reynolds said she thought after seeing the photos "was it was a murder scene."

"There was just like Ayla's blood ... everywhere," she said.

The photos showed blood in Ayla's bedroom and on a living room sofa, Reynolds said. A photo of the basement, where Ayla's father, Justin DiPietro slept, showed a "fist-sized stain" on the mattress and sheets. Blood also could be seen on DiPietro's sneakers and on a wood pallet.

Maine state police said in 2012 the blood found in the basement was "more ... than a small cut would produce."

Reynolds said the people in the home when Ayla vanished -- DiPietro, his girlfriend and DiPietro's sister -- should be arrested.

"All three of those people were in that house that night," the mother said. "All three of them know what happened to Ayla, and all three of them should be prosecuted for it."

DiPietro and his family say the girl was kidnapped.

Police say they do not believe an abduction occurred.

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