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Chorus of concerns on Egypt grows

Aug. 1, 2013 at 11:41 AM   |   Comments

LONDON, Aug. 1 (UPI) -- The British government lent its voice to growing concerns about the Egyptian violence after UNICEF said children were killed during confrontations.

British Foreign Secretary William Hague said Thursday he expressed concern about the level of violence in Egypt during a phone conversation with acting Vice President Mohamed ElBaradei.

"We want to see a peaceful resolution that will bring an urgent end to the current bloodshed," Hague said in a statement.

More than 80 people were killed in Egypt last week during violence pitting security forces against demonstrators. Conflict in Egypt erupted following a July 3 military decision to remove the Muslim Brotherhood's Mohamed Morsi as president.

UNICEF said Wednesday it was deeply concerned by reports of children being killed or injured during the political crisis. Philippe Duamelle, UNICEF's envoy to Egypt, said such actions can have long-lasting physical and psychological effects on the country's youth.

"Disturbing images of children taken during street protests indicate that, on some occasions, children have been deliberately used and put at risk as potential witnesses to or victims of violence," she said in a statement.

U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay called Sunday for an immediate investigation into the bloodshed. She said feared for Egypt's future.

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