Political violence leads to Egyptian alert

May 16, 2013 at 10:06 AM

WASHINGTON, May 16 (UPI) -- Political violence that grew out of the January anniversary of the Egyptian revolution is likely to continue, a warning from the U.S. government said.

An Egyptian uprising in 2011 unseated long-time President Hosni Mubarak. Last year, Mohamed Morsi became the first president elected in a democratic vote in Egyptian history.

Frustration with Morsi's administration has led to a series of violent clashes between police and demonstrators. The U.S. State Department said a U.S. citizen was stabbed near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo last week.

"Political unrest, which intensified prior to the constitutional referendum in December 2012 and the anniversary in 2013 of Egypt's 25th January Revolution, is likely to continue in the near future," a State Department warning read.

U.N. Rights Commissioner Navi Pillay said last week that Egypt was at "a critical moment." She expressed concerned that a series of potentially restrictive political decisions would undermine the spirit of the revolution.

Constitution Party member Alfred Raouf told Egyptian news service al-Ahram that opposition movements were hoping to get enough support for early elections during rallies scheduled Friday in downtown Cairo.

"We will prove to the regime that it has lost its legitimacy and will give hope to the people once again," he said.

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