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Modest U.S. jobs growth expected to continue

By PETER MORICI, UPI Outside View Commentator   |   April 4, 2013 at 6:44 AM   |   Comments

COLLEGE PARK, Md., April 4 (UPI) -- Forecasters expect the U.S. Labor Department to report Friday that the U.S. economy added 193,000 jobs in March. This is in line with the pace of recent months but hardly enough to lower unemployment down to acceptable levels.

In the fourth quarter, gross domestic product was up only 0.6 percent, slowed by a drop in inventory build and smaller Pentagon purchases. Those factors aren't likely to repeat and first quarter growth should register in the range of 2.5 percent.

Consumer spending is picking up as rising home and stock prices restore household wealth. However, the pace of the recovery and jobs growth remains disappointing by historical standards and the need to create millions of new jobs to lower unemployment.

Since turning the corner in mid 2009, GDP growth has averaged 2.1 percent and unemployment has fallen from 10.0 percent to 7.7 percent. In contrast, high oil prices and double-digit interest rates pushed unemployment to 10.8 percent during Ronald Reagan's first term; then GDP growth averaged 5.2 percent for the next 3 1/2 years and unemployment fell to 7.3 percent.

The U.S. economy must add more than 360,000 jobs each month for three years to lower unemployment to 6 percent. That would require growth in the range of 4-5 percent and isn't likely with current policies.

Factors contributing to the slow pace of recovery include the huge trade deficits on oil and manufactured products from China and elsewhere in Asia -- these drain demand for U.S. goods and services. Absent U.S. policies to confront Asian governments about their purposefully undervalued currencies, and to develop more oil offshore and in Alaska, the trade deficit will continue to tax growth.

The recent surge in natural gas production, and accompanying lower prices, is substantially improving the international competitiveness of industries like petrochemicals, fertilizers, plastics and primary metals -- as well as consuming industries like industrial machinery and building materials.

However, the U.S. Department of Energy is considering proposals to boost exports of liquefied gas. That would reduce the trade deficit and boost growth much less and create many fewer jobs than keeping the gas in the United States for use by energy-intensive industries.

Dodd-Frank regulations make mortgages, refinancing and home improvement loans much more difficult to obtain. The recovery in housing construction, though welcomed, remains lackluster as compared to past recoveries. In turn, those slow expansion in building materials, major appliances, furniture and other durable goods.

The high cost and slow pace of regulatory reviews are a constant complaint among businesses and dampen investment spending. Government needs to subject policies to protect the environment and other regulatory goals to the same efficacy standards the market applies to commercial technologies -- regulatory assessments and enforcement are needed but those must be delivered cost effectively and quickly to add genuine value.

Many businesses with overseas opportunities remain tentative about adding capacity and hiring workers in the United States. Instead, they look to Asia where government policies are more accommodating and prospects for growth remain stronger.

Without better trade, energy and regulatory policies, that is simply not going to happen.

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(Peter Morici is an economist and professor at the Smith School of Business, University of Maryland School, and a widely published columnist. Follow him on Twitter: @pmorici1)

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(United Press International's "Outside View" commentaries are written by outside contributors who specialize in a variety of important issues. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of United Press International. In the interests of creating an open forum, original submissions are invited.)

© 2013 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
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